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Marvel in talks with Wesley Snipes!


HGLatinBoy
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1 hour ago, Reputator said:

Seems like an odd choice not to simply recast him as it was never established that New Line's Blade series was part of the MCU, and it wouldn't make sense to have an aged Blade character in the MCU.

 

Blade ages, he just ages slower than normal humans. Also The first Blade movie WAS Marvel films first official film and Fiege was a producer on it. Makes perfect sense that they incorporate it into the MCU... and it's long been rumored that a New Blade movie would feature him mentoring his daughter. These rumors have been ongoing since Snipes got out of jail.

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6 hours ago, Hurdyb1 said:

I hope this does come to fruition. I just want to see Wesley at least one more time as the Daywalker. He made Blade a household name and again, I think Blade 1 is probably the last BEST vampire movie we have gotten. 

 

Plus Blade made me buy the soundtrack and this song was the only good song on it. :(

 

 

 

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You don't get Spiderman without Xmen and you don't get Xmen without Blade. Blade was the first,  adult contemporary take on a comic character that actually worked as a film. The movie laid the template for a whole bunch of Superhero movies afterwards by abandoning the campy tone of the 60's and embracing the more grim and gritty tone of the comics of the 80's and 90's. Blade was the first superhero movie to do it and once it made money, all those comic book movies that had been languishing in development hell for years got greenlit. Especially the Marvel ones, which at the time, were not as well known as the more popular DC characters.

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1 hour ago, skillzdadirecta said:

You don't get Spiderman without Xmen and you don't get Xmen without Blade. Blade was the first,  adult contemporary take on a comic character that actually worked as a film. The movie laid the template for a whole bunch of Superhero movies afterwards by abandoning the campy tone of the 60's and embracing the more grim and gritty tone of the comics of the 80's and 90's. Blade was the first superhero movie to do it and once it made money, all those comic book movies that had been languishing in development hell for years got greenlit. Especially the Marvel ones, which at the time, were not as well known as the more popular DC characters.

 

Well, while there were campy moments in Tim Burton's Batman films, they were definitely more built on the gritty comics than the tongue-in-cheek 60s interpretations.

 

I honestly think the root of all modern comic book movies really traces back to Batman '89, but Blade certainly made it more stylish by contemporary sensibilities.

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1 minute ago, Reputator said:

 

Well, while there were campy moments in Tim Burton's Batman films, they were definitely more built on the gritty comics than the tongue-in-cheek 60s interpretations.

 

I honestly think the root of all modern comic book movies really traces back to Batman '89, but Blade certainly made it more stylish by contemporary sensibilities.

Burton's Batman movies were definitely rooted in 60's camp. They just had his darker sensibility to them, but The Batman in his movies had more in common with Adam West's Batman than Frank Miller's.  Go back and rewatch those movies... rocket launching penguins, Bat CD Players, I could keep going. Nolan was the one who really mined the post Miller, Dark Knight Returns, Year One Batman. Not Burton.

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3 minutes ago, skillzdadirecta said:

Burton's Batman movies were definitely rooted in 60's camp. They just had his darker sensibility to them, but The Batman in his movies had more in common with Adam West's Batman than Frank Miller's.  Go back and rewatch those movies... rocket launching penguins, Bat CD Players, I could keep going. Nolan was the one who really mined the post Miller, Dark Knight Returns, Year One Batman. Not Burton.

 

Well Tim Burton himself has said that he was pulling influence from The Dark Knight Returns, that's why I said that.

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8 hours ago, skillzdadirecta said:

Yeah I know he said it but his films don't reflect that. Seemed to me he was pulling more from Beetlejuice :p

 

Tim Burton being Tim Burton. The same sort of thing people say about Sam Raimi's weird cheesy moments in the Spider-man films.

 

Point is, it wasn't based on Adam West's Batman. Saying Blade was the first to abandon that tone was inaccurate.

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4 hours ago, Reputator said:

 

Tim Burton being Tim Burton. The same sort of thing people say about Sam Raimi's weird cheesy moments in the Spider-man films.

 

Point is, it wasn't based on Adam West's Batman. Saying Blade was the first to abandon that tone was inaccurate.

And Tim Burton's Batman was possible because of Richard Donner's Superman.

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So basically they way I see it is that there are four eras of the modern super hero movie. The first era started with 1978's Superman, which spawned four three sequels and a spinoff. We also got Swamp Thing and a couple of other forgettable movies from that era. The second era started with Batman 1989, which incorporated a lot of the campy charm of the classic comics of the 50's and 60s, but melded it with a darker visual aesthetic and tone that matched the comics of the time. That movie spawned a SHIT TON of bad comics movies through the 90's which followed the same formula. The genre nearly died, though with Batman and Robin. Then in 1998 You got Blade, which was rated R and TRULY took the tone and style of contemporary comics from the "Grim and Gritty era" and put it up on screen. Gone were colorful costumes... now you got military style practical outfits that featured a lot of leather. This approach is what gave you The Xmen and other comics book based movies from the late 90's through the 2000's. This approach culminated with Batman Begins... a rebooting of the Batman series that was TOTALLY dark and much more adult in tone. It was also grounded in realism... moreso than Burton's Batman films. (No rocket launching Penguins) 

The Fourth Era starts with 2008's Iron Man which introduced the modern Marvel approach to superhero movies... contemporary settings, accessible humor with top notch special effects (for the time) 

There was definitely an evolution and Burton's Batman was part of it. But in my opinion, his Batman films were at best a bridge from the campy ere to the darker films of the late 90's, but Blade was the first comic movie to go all in with adult action and a darker tone that more closely mirrored the comics we were reading at the time.

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39 minutes ago, skillzdadirecta said:

So basically they way I see it is that there are four eras of the modern super hero movie. The first era started with 1978's Superman, which spawned four three sequels and a spinoff. We also got Swamp Thing and a couple of other forgettable movies from that era. The second era started with Batman 1989, which incorporated a lot of the campy charm of the classic comics of the 50's and 60s, but melded it with a darker visual aesthetic and tone that matched the comics of the time. That movie spawned a SHIT TON of bad comics movies through the 90's which followed the same formula. The genre nearly died, though with Batman and Robin. Then in 1998 You got Blade, which was rated R and TRULY took the tone and style of contemporary comics from the "Grim and Gritty era" and put it up on screen. Gone were colorful costumes... now you got military style practical outfits that featured a lot of leather. This approach is what gave you The Xmen and other comics book based movies from the late 90's through the 2000's. This approach culminated with Batman Begins... a rebooting of the Batman series that was TOTALLY dark and much more adult in tone. It was also grounded in realism... moreso than Burton's Batman films. (No rocket launching Penguins) 

The Fourth Era starts with 2008's Iron Man which introduced the modern Marvel approach to superhero movies... contemporary settings, accessible humor with top notch special effects (for the time) 

There was definitely an evolution and Burton's Batman was part of it. But in my opinion, his Batman films were at best a bridge from the campy ere to the darker films of the late 90's, but Blade was the first comic movie to go all in with adult action and a darker tone that more closely mirrored the comics we were reading at the time.

 

I honestly can't say I disagree with that.

 

19 minutes ago, Spawn_of_Apathy said:

What about Spawn in 1997?

 

Man, I need to see that.

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