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Finding hobbies as an adult is quite tricky.


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At thirty (and with a child on the way in...ten weeks) I don't realistically think I have that much rugby playing left in me. I'm going to play this season and see how I find it with parenting and teaching and go from there. Ultimately though, I'll want to take a step back in the next five years, possibly into coaching. Due to that, I wanted to find a suitable follow-up hobby that I could get involved in. These are a few ideas:

 

  • I enjoy walking and will look to do a lot more hiking, camping and mountain walking in the coming years, if I can. 
  • I like cycling, but the cost of entry to a decent bike is a bit off-putting (maybe Mountain Biking or at least rough terrain cycling might be better)
  • I'm keen to try open water swimming (which will mean investing in a wet-suit) and then by extension, surfing every so often, but again, high initial costs. 
  • Tennis is another one I'd be keen to try, although I feel like the fucked-ness of my hips and knees now, would be set into overload with it.
  • I used to play Badminton when I was 11-13 and could get back into that at club level. 
  • Golf though is a really tempting one. I used to play quite a lot when I was a teenager (summers with a friend of mine, a few times a week) and I can drive/putt/chip well, but the perceived golf culture in the UK is a bit off-putting. I'm trying to convince a friend of mine that lives about 90 minutes away that we could get into it together and play at a mid-point and I could also play locally and smash some balls at the driving range. But yeah, for those that golf, what kind of time investment do you put into it to not be awful?

 

I would also love to get into some table top gaming, but I literally know one person that might be able to facilitate that and he lives about an hour away...

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20 minutes ago, Amazatron said:

Learn a musical instrument, guitar is probably the most accessible.

 

I've been playing guitar for about 15 years now (not well I might add) and have been building a repetoire to give performing in pubs once lockdown has fully eased. I'm tempted to learn something new though (violin in tempting)

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Golf definitely takes a lot of time to not be horrible. I don’t play constantly but it’s always fun getting out there. I actually like how difficult it is. Instead of focusing on shooting even for the round just try to improve yourself. Even on my worst days a round of golf can be fun. 

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Just now, johnny said:

Golf definitely takes a lot of time to not be horrible. I don’t play constantly but it’s always fun getting out there. I actually like how difficult it is. Instead of focusing on shooting even for the round just try to improve yourself. Even on my worst days a round of golf can be fun. 

 

That's the aspect that I like as well. It's a nice social outing, but I'm a huge fan of hobbies that take mastery. 

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Climbing is pretty accessible. Starting at your local gym is the cost of a daypass/gear rental and after a few times you can decide if you're interested in it. Bouldering and using an autobelay requires no prior knowledge, and gyms often offer top rope belaying classes for people as well. The initial cost for your own gear to use at the gym (shoes, harness, belay device, locking carbabiner, chalk bag) can be had for around $150 (black diamond momentum package and some beginner shoes.) From there you can learn to lead and transition to outdoor climbing. A sport rack is a little more expensive since a set of quickdraws will probably run around $150 and a rope can be $150-300, and you'll probably feel better with a helmet too. There's a lot more progression to be had from there, but by the time a person is looking to build a trad rack they're probably all in anyway. I live in a relatively flat state but still have five outdoor crags within 1-2 hours of driving from my location.

 

It sounds like you live in the UK anyway, and they have a fantastic climbing history/culture.

 

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2 hours ago, Rachel said:

If you want to “master” it, is it really a hobby? aren’t hobbies supposed to be something where the main goal is to have fun? Not to become a “master” 

 

I find that becoming good at something enhances the enjoyment of it. 

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