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More Americans are living in their vehicles


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https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/more-americans-are-living-in-their-vehicles/ar-BBLiM4k?ocid=AMZN

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A fair number of the "vehicular homeless" in Silicon Valley are employed but are unable to find affordable housing, as the Associated Press noted last year. Lines of RVs can be found near the headquarters of tech heavyweights such as Apple, Google and Hewlett-Packard. Nationwide, extremely low-income renters are facing a shortage of 7.2 million rental homes, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, mclumber1 said:

One my coworkers is getting transferred down to Sunnyvale from Oregon next year, and he is strongly considering either "super commuting" from Utah every week, and staying a camper/trailer during the work week.  That's just crazy. 

So either option is living in a car 

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18 minutes ago, Massdriver said:

Zoning regulations need to be modified or just need to go. It's really sad.

I've come to realize that the issue with changing zoning is that we've been told that a house is a store of wealth that continuously goes up in value, not just a place to live. So for homeowners, zoning is a way of protecting your investment, and an increased housing supply could potentially not maximize your return. This wouldn't be so intense, except where people expected their home to be their retirement plan, have no other savings, and wages have stagnated for decades. Add in that in many places, there often are few people who want to buy some homes, and in order to "retire" they need to sell their home and buy a new one, and you've got a national situation where potentially lowering the price of housing can throw the financial situation for many borderline middle class people up into disarray.

 

It's easy to say that what they did was dumb, but when they make a big chunk of politically motivated people on this issue,it makes it much harder to make any positive changes.

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13 minutes ago, b_m_b_m_b_m said:

I've come to realize that the issue with changing zoning is that we've been told that a house is a store of wealth that continuously goes up in value, not just a place to live. So for homeowners, zoning is a way of protecting your investment, and an increased housing supply could potentially not maximize your return. This wouldn't be so intense, except where people expected their home to be their retirement plan, have no other savings, and wages have stagnated for decades. Add in that in many places, there often are few people who want to buy some homes, and in order to "retire" they need to sell their home and buy a new one, and you've got a national situation where potentially lowering the price of housing can throw the financial situation for many borderline middle class people up into disarray.

 

It's easy to say that what they did was dumb, but when they make a big chunk of politically motivated people on this issue,it makes it much harder to make any positive changes.

It's the same sort of barrier that we face to reform or repeal occupational licenses. If you're in the club, you don't want anyone to spoil the party. It doesn't mean we shouldn't try. My guess is the effect will be more modest than people realize if zoning were reformed. It may not decrease housing prices as much as it stops them from growing so quickly.

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1 hour ago, b_m_b_m_b_m said:

I've come to realize that the issue with changing zoning is that we've been told that a house is a store of wealth that continuously goes up in value, not just a place to live. So for homeowners, zoning is a way of protecting your investment, and an increased housing supply could potentially not maximize your return. This wouldn't be so intense, except where people expected their home to be their retirement plan, have no other savings, and wages have stagnated for decades. Add in that in many places, there often are few people who want to buy some homes, and in order to "retire" they need to sell their home and buy a new one, and you've got a national situation where potentially lowering the price of housing can throw the financial situation for many borderline middle class people up into disarray.

 

It's easy to say that what they did was dumb, but when they make a big chunk of politically motivated people on this issue,it makes it much harder to make any positive changes.

 

And it's created a situation where homeowners have basically started acting like an oligopolistic cartel. 

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