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The death of G-Sync inches closer...


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While Intel had voiced support for Freesync a few years ago, this latest affirmation is bigger news as it pertains to their discreet GPU business slated to launch in the next 2 to 3 years. This is likely to have a further impact in the market, already favoring Freesync in terms of market share and product offerings, as Intel stands a very good chance of producing very competitive graphics cards with the talent they've hired and the amount of attention they're giving it.

 

The video also mentions Intel's support for Vulkan, which I don't feel will have nearly as much impact given Microsoft's entrenchment there, but it's good that Intel is showing openess to... open standards, rather than trying to reinvent technologies with proprietary substitutes.

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nVidia very much needs to embrace whatever the HDMI 2.1 standard for VRR is, or many gamers may bail for a different brand.

I very much want a new VRR 4k HDR monitor, and I can get a Freesync one for $400. GSync? Cheapest (and only) option is $2000 which is several hundred more than I paid for my 65” LG OLED 4k HDR TV.

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4 hours ago, Spork3245 said:

nVidia very much needs to embrace whatever the HDMI 2.1 standard for VRR is, or many gamers may bail for a different brand.

I very much want a new VRR 4k HDR monitor, and I can get a Freesync one for $400. GSync? Cheapest (and only) option is $2000 which is several hundred more than I paid for my 65” LG OLED 4k HDR TV.

Yes.  But a Freesync monitor won't work with any video card you would want to use.  (I haven't seen an HDR Freesync monitor for quite that cheap, and I was seeing $600 ones, but they were only 60Hz refresh....)

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14 minutes ago, mikechorney said:

Yes.  But a Freesync monitor won't work with any video card you would want to use.  (I haven't seen an HDR Freesync monitor for quite that cheap, and I was seeing $600 ones, but they were only 60Hz refresh....)

 

Yes, because nVidia chooses not to support Freesync and only Gsync. The problem being, as I mentioned in my post, the VRR standard for HDMI 2.1 will not be GSync and likely is more akin to Freesync. Thus, nVidia needs to support HDMI 2.1 standards for VRR or gamers may begin flocking to other video cards.

 

Also, https://www.amazon.com/BenQ-EL2870U-3840x2160-Brightness-Intelligence/dp/B078HWN5CX/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1531429056&sr=8-1&keywords=freesync+hdr+4k

You're also not going to see above 60hz for HDR 4k since 60hz is the current limit until HDMI 2.1 and the next DP version release which will allow 120hz :p 

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3 minutes ago, Spork3245 said:

 

Yes, because nVidia chooses not to support Freesync and only Gsync. The problem being, as I mentioned in my post, the VRR standard for HDMI 2.1 will not be GSync and likely is more akin to Freesync. Thus, nVidia needs to support HDMI 2.1 standards for VRR or gamers may begin flocking to other video cards.

AMD has locked down the console market -- and TVs primarily use HDMI.  So that makes sense.

 

Unless AMD somehow magically turns around their high end gaming cards (and rumours are they diverted resources completely away from them), mid/high end cards will continue to be dominated by nVidia.  

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1 minute ago, mikechorney said:

AMD has locked down the console market -- and TVs primarily use HDMI.  So that makes sense.

 

Unless AMD somehow magically turns around their high end gaming cards (and rumours are they diverted resources completely away from them), mid/high end cards will continue to be dominated by nVidia.  

 

Those HDMI 2.1 compliant AMD cards will look a lot better to gamers who play on TVs if nVidia doesn't follow suit.  The current consoles, except the Xbone X (which is supposedly already HDMI 2.1 compliant, or at least mostly, and just needs a firmware update to "unlock" all of the features), won't work with the majority of HDMI 2.1 features, as the new bandwidth standard will be needed to carry HDR with 4k during VRR. I know that the VRR HDMI2.1 standard is similar to Freesync, but I don't think it's actually Freesync, just that it uses the same "idea" and is not based on hardware (GSync requires a physical module installed into the display).

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39 minutes ago, mikechorney said:

AMD has locked down the console market -- and TVs primarily use HDMI.  So that makes sense.

 

Unless AMD somehow magically turns around their high end gaming cards (and rumours are they diverted resources completely away from them), mid/high end cards will continue to be dominated by nVidia.  

 

That's why Intel's involvement is so important. Intel may actually turn out to be the last hope for a true competitor against NVIDIA, and I'm dearly hoping they can dish out some humble pie for all the anti-competitive bullshit they've been doing.

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26 minutes ago, Reputator said:

 

There already are some. G-Sync HDR monitors are atrociously expensive, though.

Most of them cost ~$200 more than a comparable Freesync monitor.

51 minutes ago, Reputator said:

 

That's why Intel's involvement is so important. Intel may actually turn out to be the last hope for a true competitor against NVIDIA, and I'm dearly hoping they can dish out some humble pie for all the anti-competitive bullshit they've been doing.

That's still years away...

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4 minutes ago, mikechorney said:

Most of them cost ~$200 more than a comparable Freesync monitor.

 

They are way more than $200 extra. The G-Sync HDR module itself accounts for $500 of the cost of an equipped monitor.

 

5 minutes ago, mikechorney said:

That's still years away...

 

Both Intel's discreet graphics cards and AMD's Navi 20 aren't expected until between 2020 and 2021, so it's really the same difference. But I don't think WHEN competition arrives is really relevant to the discussion anyway.

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11 minutes ago, Reputator said:

 

They are way more than $200 extra. The G-Sync HDR module itself accounts for $500 of the cost of an equipped monitor.

 

 

Both Intel's discreet graphics cards and AMD's Navi 20 aren't expected until between 2020 and 2021, so it's really the same difference. But I don't think WHEN competition arrives is really relevant to the discussion anyway.

Then my G-Sync monitor must have been almost free.  All reports I have ever read claim a premium of $150-$200, and that has been pretty consistent with what I paid.

 

Card releases 2-3 years away is forever in technology...

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24 minutes ago, mikechorney said:

Then my G-Sync monitor must have been almost free.  All reports I have ever read claim a premium of $150-$200, and that has been pretty consistent with what I paid.

 

G-Sync HDR

 

If you're still having trouble reading that I'll make you an 8k JPEG out of it.

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8 minutes ago, Reputator said:

 

G-Sync HDR

 

If you're still having trouble reading that I'll make you an 8k JPEG out of it.

That number was based on pure speculation  by one review site.  It is not a credible number.  Original quote that is getting re-reported was "I wouldn't be surprised to see that this FPGA alone makes up $500 of the final price point of these new displays, let alone the costly DDR4 memory."

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1 hour ago, mikechorney said:

Then my G-Sync monitor must have been almost free.  All reports I have ever read claim a premium of $150-$200, and that has been pretty consistent with what I paid.

 

Card releases 2-3 years away is forever in technology...

 

The only GSync HDR monitor on the market is a paltry 27" with a 4ms response time, yet costs $2000. The previously linked Freesync HDR monitor is 28", has a 1ms response time and is only $400... So, with HDR capable GSync modules, while we don't know the exact cost for said module, it's likely more than a $150-200 premium over Freesync HDR monitors.

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39 minutes ago, mikechorney said:

That number was based on pure speculation  by one review site.  It is not a credible number.  Original quote that is getting re-reported was "I wouldn't be surprised to see that this FPGA alone makes up $500 of the final price point of these new displays, let alone the costly DDR4 memory."

 

I would say that's a very plausible estimate, especially given PC Perspective's reputation.

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19 minutes ago, Spork3245 said:

 

 

The only GSync HDR monitor on the market is a paltry 27" with a 4ms response time, yet costs $2000. The previously linked Freesync HDR monitor is 28", has a 1ms response time and is only $400... So, with HDR capable GSync modules, while we don't know the exact cost for said module, it's likely more than a $150-200 premium over Freesync HDR monitors.

The $1,800 monitor (at Microcenter) is a premium 144Hz Quandum-Dot IPS panel with a 384 zone FALD backlight (don't you love the marketing terms?) and the $400 one is a budget 60Hz TN panel.  I wouldn't want to pay $1,800 for a monitor....  But I still want one of these...

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42 minutes ago, mikechorney said:

The $1,800 monitor (at Microcenter) is a premium 144Hz Quandum-Dot IPS panel with a 384 zone FALD backlight (don't you love the marketing terms?) and the $400 one is a budget 60Hz TN panel.  I wouldn't want to pay $1,800 for a monitor....  But I still want one of these...

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078GRM2MV/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_oI.rBb13A3TH7

144hz @ 4k w/HDR will only be available via GSync at the moment due to the physical module compensating for the required bandwidth to do it through a cable. Honestly, though, VRR tech shines when framerates are below 60.

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9 hours ago, Spork3245 said:

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078GRM2MV/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_oI.rBb13A3TH7

144hz @ 4k w/HDR will only be available via GSync at the moment due to the physical module compensating for the required bandwidth to do it through a cable. Honestly, though, VRR tech shines when framerates are below 60.

Yes. that is IPS -- but it is still a significantly cheaper panel than in the $1,800 G-Sync panel.  That monitor has a very low light outpout (350 CD/m2 ) and only has  sRGB colors-(which makes it debatable about whether it should even be called an HDR monitor).

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I feel like Intel has been 3 years away from making worthwhile graphics cards for the last 15 years.

 

I won't expect them to ship a product, much less a competitive one for a long time, if ever. I'll put this right next to their mobile offerings and LTE modems, and all the other Intel products that never materialized.

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