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America to launch humans to the ISS tomorrow for the first time in almost a decade


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2 minutes ago, outsida said:

The most interesting thing in all of this is they reused that very booster within 50 days to launch a Korean satellite. 

 

I think it beat the turnaround time for the quickest relaunch of a shuttle too.

 

Some may say that isn't a fair comparison, because the Falcon 9 booster is much simpler machine that encounters a much less severe thermal environment compared to the shuttle.  HOWEVER, the Shuttle had a standing army of thousands of technicians and managers who inspected and prepped the shuttle for it's next flight.  I don't know how large the refurb crew is on the Falcon boosters, but it would be a fair statement that it's a much smaller crew. 

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9 minutes ago, mclumber1 said:

I think it beat the turnaround time for the quickest relaunch of a shuttle too.

 

Some may say that isn't a fair comparison, because the Falcon 9 booster is much simpler machine that encounters a much less severe thermal environment compared to the shuttle.  HOWEVER, the Shuttle had a standing army of thousands of technicians and managers who inspected and prepped the shuttle for it's next flight.  I don't know how large the refurb crew is on the Falcon boosters, but it would be a fair statement that it's a much smaller crew. 

It's not a fair comparison, but that's kind of the point. The whole idea is that reusing a much simpler machine makes these turn arounds easier, faster, cheaper, and hopefully, safer.

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7 minutes ago, TwinIon said:

It's not a fair comparison, but that's kind of the point. The whole idea is that reusing a much simpler machine makes these turn arounds easier, faster, cheaper, and hopefully, safer.

 

Yeah.  The shuttle was a compromised launch system from the start because you had too many organizations (NASA, NSA, CIA, USAF, Etc.) all asking for certain capabilities.  So it became a complicated machine that had way to many single points of failure. 

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1 hour ago, mclumber1 said:

 

Yeah.  The shuttle was a compromised launch system from the start because you had too many organizations (NASA, NSA, CIA, USAF, Etc.) all asking for certain capabilities.  So it became a complicated machine that had way to many single points of failure. 

 

Too bad the marines didn't get involved, or we'd have had a VTOL version!

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2 minutes from starting the deorbit sequence. 

 

 

What I will say is that I HATE how branded everything is. 

 

"Bob and Doug will use the Draco thrusters to spin Dragon."

 

 

 

We should nationalize Spacex. 

 

 

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For those wondering, the charring on the Dragon is normal.  It's the "soot" that is left over from the heat shield as it burned up during reentry. 

 

Also, the moron flying the Trump flag should be arrested for violating range safety rules.  

 

 

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Wow, there are A LOT of private boats surrounding the Capsule and recovery vessels.  They really need the Coast Guard there for the next landing to keep these lookie-loos away.

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