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~*Official #COVID-19 Thread of Doom*~


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The cult of "death is the only bad thing" (like we know the long term effects of infection on people generally and children specifically given their unique physiology) is the most harmful thing I'm sick of responding to.

 

Like look at this kid and tell me that the only thing to worry about is death.

Like my newborn has a heart murmur. Pediatric cardiologist says it's ok for now but who's to say in 3 months for the next checkup? Does this make her high risk? It's cold fucking comfort when you can't really know what high risk is because it can't be diagnosed yet, and the only thing people talk about is how few children have died and how they were all "high risk".

 

As if it would not DESTROY an entire family for even one death. My grandma lost a child at less than one year old and buried her around Christmas. She was depressed for years and would never talk about it, I found out through my dad and aunt. I don't want that for my family or anyone's. I know this is rambling on a bit by now but I've had it with the serious effects that this virus has on kids and families being minimized or disregarded as if a relatively low number of pediatric deaths is just fine when it is not. I'm not necessarily directing this at anyone here but Jesus fuck man I just can't stand it anywhere.

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17 minutes ago, AbsolutSurgen said:

In my area -- 1/3 of children are still electing for remote learning.

17 children have died in Canada during the entire pandemic.  0.1% of the total, despite them representing 20% of the cases.

Children aren't dying in large numbers.

 

It's almost like Canada has been handling the pandemic better than the US. At least in your area 1/3 of students can elect to go remote. My Republican governor squashed that saying it was of utmost importance that 100% of students are in person this school year.

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3 minutes ago, AbsolutSurgen said:

How am I being an ogre?


The story here is that girl died needlessly because she was forced to constantly be around sick classmates. You’re victim shaming her and posting a picture of her family as if that says something. It’s grotesque.

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8 minutes ago, CitizenVectron said:

 

Having been to Ukraine, I do not believe there are any fat slavic people. They are perpetually underfed (either by choice or lack of food supply).

 

Having been to Ukraine, I was surprised to see how fat some people are. 

 

Potatoes, man...

 

 

EDIT: To clarify, I don't mean Huel from Breaking Bad level fat where their entire body is large proportions. I mean people with barrels for guts. That I saw. I didn't see anyone from those exploitative TLC shows. 

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I think we can all agree that the number of fat people in Ukraine is dwarfed by the number in the US. 

 

 

And they are not doing good with their vaccines. AND they have another covid wave ramping up. Two friends of mine in the east got covid about a week after their first vaccine dose. 

 

 

EDIT: I just remembered that my avatar is literally the Ukrainian national symbol lol

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21 hours ago, SuperSpreader said:

 

I don't do roids but I regularly get the cold chills and trembling at night from pushing myself at the gym at least twice a week. I... can't not push myself. 

 

Twice a week isn't bad, it's more so doing it constantly and never giving your body a rest period.  You're fine though, you're working out the healthy way, and not injecting chemicals into your body to push your muscles past their natural abilities.  Besides, if you're wearing a proper mask in public, it's not exactly the end of the world to have days when you've worked yourself hard.  I did it yesterday myself as I was feeling good enough to extend my run.  I'm just going to take it easy today, and run at a slower pace to give my muscles time to recover.

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1 hour ago, vaxick said:

 

Twice a week isn't bad, it's more so doing it constantly and never giving your body a rest period.  You're fine though, you're working out the healthy way, and not injecting chemicals into your body to push your muscles past their natural abilities.  Besides, if you're wearing a proper mask in public, it's not exactly the end of the world to have days when you've worked yourself hard.  I did it yesterday myself as I was feeling good enough to extend my run.  I'm just going to take it easy today, and run at a slower pace to give my muscles time to recover.

Aroused The Office GIF

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In the case of Covid, the fable we tell ourselves is that our day-to-day behavior dictates the course of the pandemic. When we are good — by staying socially distant and wearing our masks — cases are supposed to fall. When we are bad — by eating in restaurants, hanging out with friends and going to a theater or football game — cases are supposed to rise.

The idea is especially alluring to anybody making an effort to be careful and feeling frustrated that so many other Americans seem blasé. After all, the Covid fable does have an some truth to it. Social distancing and masking do reduce the spread of the virus. They just are not as powerful as people often imagine.

The main determinants of Covid’s spread (other than vaccines, which are extremely effective) remain mysterious. Some activities that seem dangerous, like in-person school or crowded outdoor gatherings, may not always be. As unsatisfying as it is, we do not know why cases have recently plunged. The decline is consistent with the fact that Covid surges often last for about two months before receding, but that’s merely a description of the data, not a causal explanation.

“We still are really in the cave ages in terms of understanding how viruses emerge, how they spread, how they start and stop, why they do what they do,” Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota, has told me.

In coming weeks and months, it is possible that the virus will surge again, maybe because of a new variant or because vaccine immunity will wane. It is also possible that the population has built up enough immunity — from both vaccines and previous infections — that Delta will have been the last major wave.

We don’t know, and we do not have to pretend otherwise. We do not have to treat Covid as a facile referendum on virtue.

When caseloads are high, it makes sense to take precautions, even if we can’t be sure how much they matter. When caseloads are lower, it makes sense to take fewer, because almost every precaution has a cost. Other than that, the best we can do is get vaccinated and, as Osterholm says, stay humble.

 

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22 minutes ago, AbsolutSurgen said:

 

 

 

Articles like this make no sense because they seem to ignore that there are other countries around the world that have managed their spread of the virus mostly fine with things like masking and social distancing before vaccines. Nothing is 100%, but this isn't some mystery. Some people just never help out. It's a real mystery why cases and deaths rise, we freak and put some restrictions in place, then cases and deaths lower, we ease restrictions and then see the beginning of a new wave. I have no idea how that happens.

 

We also know why some outdoor events and in school classes aren't always super spreaders. For outdoor events, you have to imagine how wind effects things, how much people are standing still, how much they're yelling and whatnot. For schools, well, we already got cool graphs to explain that last year and it largely depends on who is contagious and whether it's an unmasked teacher shedding at the front of the room.

 

 

CGIPMBM72JE6TGM7MHAEGQ3QN4_1.png
ELPAIS.COM

The risk of contagion is highest in indoor spaces but can be reduced by applying all available measures to combat infection via aerosols. Here is an overview of the likelihood of infection in three everyday...

 

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7 minutes ago, Ghost_MH said:

 

Articles like this make no sense because they seem to ignore that there are other countries around the world that have managed their spread of the virus mostly fine with things like masking and social distancing before vaccines. Nothing is 100%, but this isn't some mystery. Some people just never help out. It's a real mystery why cases and deaths rise, we freak and put some restrictions in place, then cases and deaths lower, we ease restrictions and then see the beginning of a new wave. I have no idea how that happens.

 

We also know why some outdoor events and in school classes aren't always super spreaders. For outdoor events, you have to imagine how wind effects things, how much people are standing still, how much they're yelling and whatnot. For schools, well, we already got cool graphs to explain that last year and it largely depends on who is contagious and whether it's an unmasked teacher shedding at the front of the room.

 

 

CGIPMBM72JE6TGM7MHAEGQ3QN4_1.png
ELPAIS.COM

The risk of contagion is highest in indoor spaces but can be reduced by applying all available measures to combat infection via aerosols. Here is an overview of the likelihood of infection in three everyday...

 

 

Yeah, it's a dumb article. "lol, covid is a mystery!"

 

We know exactly how it spreads—as you said, by aerosol. Sure, we might not know the exact specifics for filtration, etc, but we do know 100% a few truths:

  • You can't catch it unless you breath it in, so if you're not around people, you won't catch it (so less trips out of the home means less transmission)
  • The amount you are exposed to matters. A single breath could infect you, but it seems that duration matters a lot. Spending less time around others indoors reduces transmission
  • As a corollary to the above, you can reduce duration of exposure by making sure air is cycled out of indoor space through good ventillation
  • You can reduce some exposure through masking (which by this point has been conclusively proven to reduce transmission, but as much as 40%)

So yeah, there will be some specific situations where we don't know the exact risk of transmission (because we don't know the air cycling of every single building), but we do know the general tips, in order of importance:

  • Don't be around other people indoors
  • Be vaccinated
  • If you have to be around others indoors, wear a mask and keep it as short as possible

 

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16 minutes ago, CitizenVectron said:

 

Yeah, it's a dumb article. "lol, covid is a mystery!"

 

We know exactly how it spreads—as you said, by aerosol. Sure, we might not know the exact specifics for filtration, etc, but we do know 100% a few truths:

  • You can't catch it unless you breath it in, so if you're not around people, you won't catch it (so less trips out of the home means less transmission)
  • The amount you are exposed to matters. A single breath could infect you, but it seems that duration matters a lot. Spending less time around others indoors reduces transmission
  • As a corollary to the above, you can reduce duration of exposure by making sure air is cycled out of indoor space through good ventillation
  • You can reduce some exposure through masking (which by this point has been conclusively proven to reduce transmission, but as much as 40%)

So yeah, there will be some specific situations where we don't know the exact risk of transmission (because we don't know the air cycling of every single building), but we do know the general tips, in order of importance:

  • Don't be around other people indoors
  • Be vaccinated
  • If you have to be around others indoors, wear a mask and keep it as short as possible

 

That wasn't the point of the article.

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10 minutes ago, AbsolutSurgen said:

 

 

That wasn't the point of the article.

 

What was the point of this article written in October of 2021, six months after the vaccines were widely available? It's whole crutch is that many are treating these COVID waves as a moral failure on the part millions of Americans when the spread of COVID and how waves come and go is more complicated than that. Sure, but also, where would we be if everyone just masked, socially distanced, or more importantly, just got vaccinated? The only answer is that we wouldn't be dealing with thousands of deaths everyday, so yeah, it's a moral failure on the part of millions of Americans that could have saved hundreds of thousands of lives, but chose not to because it was inconvenient

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43 minutes ago, Ghost_MH said:

 

What was the point of this article written in October of 2021, six months after the vaccines were widely available? It's whole crutch is that many are treating these COVID waves as a moral failure on the part millions of Americans when the spread of COVID and how waves come and go is more complicated than that. Sure, but also, where would we be if everyone just masked, socially distanced, or more importantly, just got vaccinated? The only answer is that we wouldn't be dealing with thousands of deaths everyday, so yeah, it's a moral failure on the part of millions of Americans that could have saved hundreds of thousands of lives, but chose not to because it was inconvenient

So is the fact that wave is ebbing right now a moral success?

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4 minutes ago, AbsolutSurgen said:

So is the fact that wave is ebbing right now a moral success?

 

Vaccine and mask mandates work. Who'd a thunk it? Hospitals across the country in the news warning folks their hospitals are full helped? Cool. So, yeah. A moral success, but really now of a failure of convictions for so these anti-vaxxers and anti-maskers who don't really want to be out of work in spite of their Facebook ramblings.

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3 minutes ago, Ghost_MH said:

 

Vaccine and mask mandates work. Who'd a thunk it? Hospitals across the country in the news warning folks their hospitals are full helped? Cool. So, yeah. A moral success, but really now of a failure of convictions for so these anti-vaxxers and anti-maskers who don't really want to be out of work in spite of their Facebook ramblings.

Vaccination works - that's not the point.

However, the vaccination rate in the US has largely not changed over the last two months.  Neither the surge, nor the ebb in the recent wave in the US were caused by changes in vaccination rates.

Cloth masks are largely ineffective at meaningfully reducing Covid transmission.

 

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1 hour ago, AbsolutSurgen said:

 

 

That wasn't the point of the article.


I’m never surprised when this board can’t engage with what is actually written and instead mount up their hobby horse issue and go to town :p 

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