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~*Official #COVID-19 Thread of Doom*~


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1 hour ago, b_m_b_m_b_m said:

 

Enough for the whole of the US by Independence day? Sign me the fuck up

 

 

Awesome news, but there's a whole lot of the population under 18. I think it's likely kids don't start getting it until the fall, but timelines there have been pretty vague from what I've seen.

 

Huge mile stone to have adult population by summer, but still likely put the finish line a little bit further out.

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1 hour ago, Gavin King said:

 

Awesome news, but there's a whole lot of the population under 18. I think it's likely kids don't start getting it until the fall, but timelines there have been pretty vague from what I've seen.

 

Huge mile stone to have adult population by summer, but still likely put the finish line a little bit further out.

XSC27JQCQ4I6XOJOAKLHN6PL5Q.jpg&w=1440
WWW.WASHINGTONPOST.COM

Even if we don't reach coronavirus herd immunity, that doesn't mean we cannot control the disease.

 

Pfizer and moderna are open to 16 year olds.

 

Given the risk to younger children, with enough vaccinations and sufficient contact tracing it seems the risk to younger children is low and a good measure of control will be in place

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21 minutes ago, b_m_b_m_b_m said:
XSC27JQCQ4I6XOJOAKLHN6PL5Q.jpg&w=1440
WWW.WASHINGTONPOST.COM

Even if we don't reach coronavirus herd immunity, that doesn't mean we cannot control the disease.

 

Pfizer and moderna are open to 16 year olds.

 

Given the risk to younger children, with enough vaccinations and sufficient contact tracing it seems the risk to younger children is low and a good measure of control will be in place


Moderna is 18+

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38 minutes ago, Remarkableriots said:
210219163252-trudeau-presser-0219-super-
WWW.CNN.COM

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau warned Canadians that public health measures, including restrictions on indoor social gatherings, would have to continue for weeks to come as new Covid-19 variants...

 

 

The article is a few days old and vaccine rollout has jumped by quite a bit, but the general point about being vulnerable to a third wave (caused by variants) is very true. Right now the vaccines in LTC facilities is starting to cut down on deaths in Canada and the US, and the restrictions have worked to bring down the second wave, but the variants are growing as a percentage of cases each day, and soon will be the majority.

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00virus-canada-shame3-videoSixteenByNine
WWW.NYTIMES.COM

The fear of public shaming is becoming so prevalent in some Canadian provinces that doctors worry it is driving virus cases underground.
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Canadians might be known internationally as nice, apologetic and fair-minded. But, a year after the pandemic arrived, some Canadians worry it has exposed a very different national persona: judgmental, suspicious and vengeful. Covid-shaming has become fervent in parts of the country, with locals calling for the heads of not just politicians and doctors breaking the rules but their own family members and neighbors.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRTFkO4ce2uykeJYrXJTcw

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51 minutes ago, CitizenVectron said:

 

The article is a few days old and vaccine rollout has jumped by quite a bit, but the general point about being vulnerable to a third wave (caused by variants) is very true. Right now the vaccines in LTC facilities is starting to cut down on deaths in Canada and the US, and the restrictions have worked to bring down the second wave, but the variants are growing as a percentage of cases each day, and soon will be the majority.

Variants can be controlled without vaccines, as in south africa, and their lockdown isn't any more stringent than previous ones.

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26 minutes ago, Remarkableriots said:
00virus-canada-shame3-videoSixteenByNine
WWW.NYTIMES.COM

The fear of public shaming is becoming so prevalent in some Canadian provinces that doctors worry it is driving virus cases underground.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRTFkO4ce2uykeJYrXJTcw

 

NYT with a trash article, again. "Should we judge people who are telling rule-breakers to stop? Don't the rule-breakers deserve respect and love?"

 

Obviously there should be no shaming of people who catch COVID-19 generally...but yeah, some people should be shamed for breaking the rules. In my province right now no one is allowed to go to anyone else's house for any reason other than emergency. If I saw my neighbour having a house party, I'd 100% phone it in to police and call them out on it.

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13 minutes ago, sblfilms said:


I can’t imagine a scenario in which I’d narc like that :p 

 

During the time when gatherings were not allowed, a teenager had a house party (with permission of parents) in a small city in my province. Over 100 people attended, and something like 60 ended up with COVID-19, and spread it further. So I am 100% phoning in neighbours who violate the rules like that. Will I phone in if a family has their grandma show up for 15 minutes? No. But people hosting 10+ people deserve the fines ($2,500+). 

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16 hours ago, Jason said:

 

Did he completely lose his taste first though? My sense of taste seems muted today but it was fine leading up to today and now it just seems muted, I'm definitely tasting more than just the heat of hot sauce for instance. Trying to figure out if going directly from having a normal sense of taste to a muted sense of taste without ever completely losing it is a possibility. 

Taste is really complicated -- it combines info from your taste buds, and olafactory neurons (i.e. your sense of smell) -- most doctors believe the loss of taste being reported due to covid is due to the Covid virus attacking your olafactory neurons.  So people should still be able to taste sweet/bitter/etc. using their taste buds.  Heat from peppers is completely different -- it is due to how capsaicin creates a burning sensation anywhere -- so would be unaffected by COVID.

 

Most reports I have seen show that most people suffer a significant loss of taste/smell -- so if you can put a coffee bean/orange near your nose and still smell it, I wouldn't immediately assume you have Covid symptoms.  Even a common cold can reduce your sense of smell/taste to some degree.

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“Canada was pretty slow to make the initial decisions for domestic vaccine development in manufacturing, despite having internationally recognized expertise in vaccine development,” Lewis told the House of Commons health committee.

Lewis said Canada “took a careful, risk-averse and committee-based decision approach that lead to a relatively modest amount of scattered funding for companies in Canada to develop domestic vaccine.”

“This put the financial risk of vaccine development — and our country’s national security — on them, which I think was a mistake,” Lewis told MPs.

Lewis said he estimates it costs in the range of $350 million to $600 million to bring a vaccine from initial discovery to the end of phase three trials. The National Research Council, by comparison, gave his company about $5 million to get to phase one trials.

“This really put the major part of the burden of development on the companies themselves,” he said. “I think if we’d received up-front funding at the beginning…we’d be well into phase three and toward licensure by now.”

Lewis acknowledged that “hindsight is 20/20” when it comes to which vaccines should have been funded early. “But I think it’s extremely clear that if you look at the success around the globe, decisive and upfront funding of multiple vaccine candidates all the way through to the end was key to both their success and their speed,” he said.

The committee also heard from Gary Kobinger, director of Laval University’s Infectious Disease Research Centre, who agreed that the federal government has been far too slow in supporting domestic vaccine development. Kobinger, who has been part of Canadian teams that developed vaccines for Ebola and Zika, said his non-profit struggled to get federal funding for its own potential COVID-19 vaccine, receiving just $1 million to do a preclinical study.

“If you look at what’s happened in the United States and Great Britain, really huge amounts of investment there,” Kobinger said, speaking in French. “But here, a million dollars, that’s not going to get you very far.”

Kobinger said it’s partly his own fault that his vaccine candidate didn’t get more funding, as he was a member of the federal vaccine task force. However, he resigned from the task force in September due to concerns over its lack of transparency and protections against conflicts of interest.

The health committee also heard on Monday from witnesses who defended and explained the government’s approach, including Mitch Davies, president of the National Research Council, and Alan Bernstein, a member of the federal vaccine task force and president of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

Bernstein told MPs the task force was focused on how to identify safe and effective vaccines and secure a reliable supply for Canada.

“In doing so, we were also tasked to look at both domestic and international candidates, and to look at the state of biomedical bio-manufacturing capacity in the country,” Bernstein said. “As you will recall, there was no vaccine last summer, nor was it clear whether there would ever be a vaccine. I want to stress that: most vaccine journeys actually end in failure. So we were really trying to cover our bases with vaccines that we recommended to government.”

NA0223-vaccine-rollout_web.png?quality=9

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“The other domestic candidates, some showed promise, but for a variety of reasons the vaccine task force felt that they were at too early a stage for significant investment at the time we looked at them,” Bernstein said. Six of those, including Entos, were given the National Research Council funding of about $5 million each.

The committee also heard from Health Canada’s Chief Medical Advisor Supriya Sharma, who said there’s still no firm timeline for the AstraZeneca vaccine to be approved in Canada, but the process remains in the final stage. She said they’ve reviewed all the data but are still putting questions to the company and waiting for responses.

“That dialogue with the company, in terms of the finalization of the review, is ongoing,” she said. “It’s complicated. We know that we’ve got different regulators that are looking at the same data for AstraZeneca and are making different decisions based on the science. That’s why this is taking a little bit longer than the ones that we have done before.”

Vaccine rollout in Canada is going very slow, my parents (late 70s) still have no firm timeline on when they will be able to get their shots.  My uncle (80s) has been told he will be able to signup to get one in late March.

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15 minutes ago, AbsolutSurgen said:

Taste is really complicated -- it combines info from your taste buds, and olafactory neurons (i.e. your sense of smell) -- most doctors believe the loss of taste being reported due to covid is due to the Covid virus attacking your olafactory neurons.  So people should still be able to taste sweet/bitter/etc. using their taste buds.  Heat from peppers is completely different -- it is due to how capsaicin creates a burning sensation anywhere -- so would be unaffected by COVID.

 

Most reports I have seen show that most people suffer a significant loss of taste/smell -- so if you can put a coffee bean/orange near your nose and still smell it, I wouldn't immediately assume you have Covid symptoms.  Even a common cold can reduce your sense of smell/taste to some degree.

 

I stuck my nose in a box of dryer sheets yesterday and it seemed like it didn't smell as strongly as it should but I could still smell it. And the COVID test came back negative. So it was probably just the congestion (which thankfully based on the negative result seems to have not been from COVID) muting my sense of smell and thus also my sense of taste. 

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