Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Remarkableriots

Something Appears to Have Ripped a Massive Hole in the Milky Way's Edge

Recommended Posts

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/something-appears-to-have-ripped-a-massive-hole-in-the-milky-way-s-edge/ar-AACVfeb?ocid=AMZN

Quote

What this “perturber” is, however, is unknown. "It's a dense bullet of something," Bonaca told LiveScience. Telescopes failed to find the source—so what could it be?

The hole is enormous, so whatever made it must also have been. "It's much more massive than a star,” she told the website. “Something like a million times the mass of the sun. So there are just no stars of that mass. We can rule that out. And if it were a black hole, it would be a supermassive black hole of the kind we find at the center of our own galaxy."

The problem with this idea is that there are no signs of a supermassive black hole in the vicinity.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The aliens heard a white person say it with the hard R. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheLeon said:

Thanks, Obama.

 

fox news idk GIF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The nice thing about collisions at the galactic scale is that no two things will ever hit each other. When Andromeda eventually collides with the Milky Way, the chances of even a single collision occurring (between two stars) is practically infinitesimal. Stars are just too far apart. Obviously gravity will pull things around, but this will only matter for the stars close to the core of the galaxies who could be moved into the super-massive black holes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, CitizenVectron said:

The nice thing about collisions at the galactic scale is that no two things will ever hit each other. When Andromeda eventually collides with the Milky Way, the chances of even a single collision occurring (between two stars) is practically infinitesimal. Stars are just too far apart. Obviously gravity will pull things around, but this will only matter for the stars close to the core of the galaxies who could be moved into the super-massive black holes.

Quote

GW170817 was a gravitational wave (GW) signal observed by the LIGO and Virgodetectors on 17 August 2017, originating from the shell elliptical galaxy NGC 4993. The GW was produced by the last minutes of two neutron stars spiralling closer to each other and finally merging, and is the first GW observation which has been confirmed by non-gravitational means.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/GW170817

Quote

A stellar collision is the coming together of two stars[1] caused by stellar dynamics within a star cluster, or by the orbital decay of a binary star due to stellar mass loss or gravitational radiation, or by other mechanisms not yet well understood.

Astronomers predict that events of this type occur in the globular clusters of our galaxy about once every 10,000 years.[2] On 2 September 2008 scientists first observed a stellar merger in Scorpius (named V1309 Scorpii), though it was not known to be the result of a stellar merger at the time.[3] A series of stellar collisions in a dense cluster over a short period of time can lead to an intermediate-mass black hole via "runaway stellar collisions".[4]

Any stars in the universe can collide, whether they are 'alive', meaning fusion is still active in the star, or 'dead', with fusion no longer taking place. White dwarf stars, neutron stars, black holes, main sequence stars, giant stars, and supergiants are very different in type, mass, temperature, and radius, and so react differently.[2]

A gravitational wave event that occurred on 25 August 2017, GW170817, was reported on 16 October 2017 to be associated with the merger of two neutron stars in a distant galaxy, the first such merger to be observed via gravitational radiation

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellar_collision

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Remarkableriots said:

 

Oh it's definitely true that stellar collisions happen all of the time. But they tend to happen to stars who already orbit each other in a double or triple system. When two galaxies merge, they tend to just pass through each other. Stars can more easily collide in local regions since they are all travelling in the same direction at roughly the same speed, so their gravity can pull them together (similar to how planets form in a solar system, by matter condensing in an orbit). But when they are moving in opposite directions, collisions are nearly impossible due to the scales of distance involved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...