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California will soon require pet stores to only sell rescue dogs and cats


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https://www.today.com/pets/california-will-soon-require-pet-stores-only-sell-rescue-dogs-t146014

 

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A new year means new laws for the state of California. Originally approved in October of 2017 by Governor Jerry Brown, a new state law will go into place on January 1, 2019 that requires all pet stores to get dogs, cats, and rabbits from rescue organizations rather than breeders.

 

This makes the state the first to implement these rules for pet stores.

 

Under California's AB 485 law, all pet stores also must maintain records for each animal, including a sign that lists the name of the shelter that the animal was obtained. Stores that violate the new law will be subjected to a fine of $500.

 

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Before the bill was passed, 36 cities in California already had bans on mass-breeding. AB 485 will enforce these policies statewide.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, 2user1cup said:

Sounds like b.s.

Never underestimate the power of greed.

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/investigations/dog-auction-rescue-groups-donations/?utm_term=.6c977aac5af7

 

An effort that animal rescuers began more than a decade ago to buy dogs for $5 or $10 apiece from commercial breeders has become a nationwide shadow market that today sees some rescuers, fueled by Internet fundraising, paying breeders $5,000 or more for a single dog.

The result is a river of rescue donations flowing from avowed dog saviors to the breeders, two groups that have long disparaged each other. The rescuers call many breeders heartless operators of inhumane “puppy mills” and work to ban the sale of their dogs in brick-and-mortar pet stores. The breeders call “retail rescuers” hypocritical dilettantes who hide behind nonprofit status while doing business as unregulated, online pet stores.

 

But for years, they have come together at dog auctions where no cameras are allowed, with rescuers enriching breeders and some breeders saying more puppies are being bred for sale to the rescuers.

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I'm sure there's some caveat I'm not seeing at first glance but as a major animal person, this looks good. 

 

A local rescue here takes in cats from Egypt due to their massive over-population and I adopted two of them last year. One of them was named "Big Boy" by their original owner, what a name. 

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13 minutes ago, PaladinSolo said:

Never underestimate the power of greed.

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/investigations/dog-auction-rescue-groups-donations/?utm_term=.6c977aac5af7

 

An effort that animal rescuers began more than a decade ago to buy dogs for $5 or $10 apiece from commercial breeders has become a nationwide shadow market that today sees some rescuers, fueled by Internet fundraising, paying breeders $5,000 or more for a single dog.

The result is a river of rescue donations flowing from avowed dog saviors to the breeders, two groups that have long disparaged each other. The rescuers call many breeders heartless operators of inhumane “puppy mills” and work to ban the sale of their dogs in brick-and-mortar pet stores. The breeders call “retail rescuers” hypocritical dilettantes who hide behind nonprofit status while doing business as unregulated, online pet stores.

 

But for years, they have come together at dog auctions where no cameras are allowed, with rescuers enriching breeders and some breeders saying more puppies are being bred for sale to the rescuers.

Everything is horrible.

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23 minutes ago, CastlevaniaNut18 said:

That's fine, but most people buy their dogs from breeders in my experience. 

They do?


I've literally never met anyone who has bought an animal from a breeder. Breeders are looked down upon around here, as a matter of fact. Have been for as long as I can remember.

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15 minutes ago, Jason said:

 

The point is to clamp down on the puppy mills that stock the pet shops. 

I figured so. Which is why I said it was a good thing.

6 minutes ago, Xbob42 said:

They do?


I've literally never met anyone who has bought an animal from a breeder. Breeders are looked down upon around here, as a matter of fact. Have been for as long as I can remember.

There's a world outside of California. It's pretty big.

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Just now, Xbob42 said:

Right. You gave your experience, I gave mine.

I mean, you asked, as if I was wrong. I don't know what it's like in California. But living in various areas and having dog-owning friends in other states, yeah, I've never known anyone who bought a dog from a pet store. Breeders are extremely common. If you want a pure-bred dog, you're almost certainly going to be buying from a breeder.

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Just now, CastlevaniaNut18 said:

I mean, you asked, as if I was wrong. I don't know what it's like in California. But living in various areas and having dog-owning friends in other states, yeah, I've never known anyone who bought a dog from a pet store. Breeders are extremely common. If you want a pure-bred dog, you're almost certainly going to be buying from a breeder.

I... did? Alright. I was more surprised than anything, as I didn't see that in California or Iowa, which are the two states I've lived in. Although people didn't do much in Iowa besides get drunk and be sad.

 

I've also known very few people that were after pure-bred dogs, due to the insane costs associated. Damn things cost a fortune.

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Seems like everyone around here wants a pure-breed. But then, dogs are often used for specific tasks, like herding or hunting, so that's what people are after. We had some pure-bred dogs when I was growing up, mostly heelers, labs, beagles, chows, and a border collie, but we never paid much for them, because we knew people or they weren't registered with the AKC. My dad actually bred beagles and chows before I was born and when I was very young.

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For what it's worth, I went to a private breeder, myself. I really wanted a dog, but my asthma sucks so I needed a guaranteed not to shed pooch. I wound up grabbing a mini schnauzer from a private breeder down in Rhode Island. Breeder was a show dog breeder, but ours came in at $750 since she was a runt and, apparently, not fit for show dog material...whatever that means.

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34 minutes ago, Xbob42 said:

They do?


I've literally never met anyone who has bought an animal from a breeder. Breeders are looked down upon around here, as a matter of fact. Have been for as long as I can remember.

My mom use to run a pet grooming shop in so cal, more than half of the customers had pets from breeders. Even most of the dogs we owned were from breeders.

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18 minutes ago, CastlevaniaNut18 said:

My dad actually bred beagles and chows before I was born and when I was very young.

Uggg chows, my most hated breed. Sure they’re cute little bears when small but most/all of the adult chows I interacted with were very ill tempered/aggressive.

 

I’ve met more rottweilers that act like giant babies than chows. :(

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5 minutes ago, chakoo said:

Uggg chows, my most hated breed. Sure they’re cute little bears when small but most/all of the adult chows I interacted with were very ill tempered/aggressive.

 

I’ve met more rottweilers that act like giant babies than chows. :(

I can really only remember one of our chows. His name was Goomba and I remember a generally lazy, lovable, dumb animal. He died the morning of my kindergarten field trip to the zoo. My parents didn't tell me til after we got home that day. 

 

But, yeah, I'm aware of the general characteristics of chows. 

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15 minutes ago, chakoo said:

Uggg chows, my most hated breed. Sure they’re cute little bears when small but most/all of the adult chows I interacted with were very ill tempered/aggressive.

 

I’ve met more rottweilers that act like giant babies than chows. :(

 

It seems like chows are more likely than the average dog to be owned by people who won't train them properly.

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Just now, Jason said:

 

It seems like chows are more likely than the average dog to be owned by people who won't train them properly.

Hard to say really as that can be the case for almost any dog/breed. Poor owner will lead to a miss behaving pet. Other than customer’s dogs, the only friend I knew who owned a pair of chows, they were well cared for but were still aggressive towards men outside the family :/

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I live in California and Xbob is right about the stigma. I *always* hear people trashing breeders, but I have a few friends who only buy dogs from breeders. It bothers me, but they’re also republicans so I’m not surprised. When I’m in a position to get a dog I’m 100% going rescue. I can’t imagine buying from a breeder unless I had a reason to like Ghost. 

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According to the ASPCA, 34% of people get dogs from breeders while only 23% are obtained from shelters.

 

Most of the dogs that my family owns are from breeders, which is not something that I would ever consider for myself. I grew up with purebred dogs and I loved them, but so many dogs my family had terrible health issues that feel attributable to breeding. Poodles and pugs in particular. Most people that are buying dogs purely as pets (as opposed to service animals or even hunting dogs) feel like they need a specific breed, but I don't think I've ever met someone with a rescued mix that didn't bond with it. 

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1 hour ago, TwinIon said:

According to the ASPCA, 34% of people get dogs from breeders while only 23% are obtained from shelters.

 

Most of the dogs that my family owns are from breeders, which is not something that I would ever consider for myself. I grew up with purebred dogs and I loved them, but so many dogs my family had terrible health issues that feel attributable to breeding. Poodles and pugs in particular. Most people that are buying dogs purely as pets (as opposed to service animals or even hunting dogs) feel like they need a specific breed, but I don't think I've ever met someone with a rescued mix that didn't bond with it. 

I really want a pug, but I also know they tend to have health issues.  It'll be a while before I seriously consider getting my own dog, but still.

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