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Pikachu

General Gaming Metro Exodus - Information Thread, update: multiple reviews posted (OpenCritic average - 83%)

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13 minutes ago, Pikachu said:

 

The game is more like STALKER. It's not an RPG, but you can modify and customize your weapons with different parts as demonstrated in the weapons videos. You have to manage your ammo and resources well otherwise you can run out especially on harder difficulties. 

I've never played STALKER either lol, but I'll check out the reviews and see if it's for me. It definitely looks very good and has my interest piqued!

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14 minutes ago, The def star said:

I'm waiting for reviews as this game looks damn good. 

 
They should drop in an hour.

Tons of reviews should go up soon, Feb 15th is packed.

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I've never played STALKER either and I don't know what to make of this really. Some questions:

 

1. Has the gunplay been good in previous titles?

2. Is it open world?

3. Does it have endless RPG customization etc.?

4. Are these games typically fucking huge or a reasonable size?

5. Are previous titles worth playing?

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3 minutes ago, Bloodporne said:

I've never played STALKER either and I don't know what to make of this really. Some questions:

 

1. Has the gunplay been good in previous titles?

2. Is it open world?

3. Does it have endless RPG customization etc.?

4. Are these games typically fucking huge or a reasonable size?

5. Are previous titles worth playing?

(1) The gunplay is "servicable" but I personally played the two previous games in near full-on stealth.

(2) This is semi-open world with a hub and spoke system (I think)

(3) Nope

(4) The previous two games could be completed in about 10 to 12 hours, but this one is supposedly longer

(5) Absolutely.

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I need no review to know this will be a good game! These guys have a solid niche with the Metro series and I have no doubt they will continue to be very good at creating these story driven, atmospheric FPSs.  

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6 minutes ago, SFLUFAN said:

(1) The gunplay is "servicable" but I personally played the two previous games in near full-on stealth.

(2) This is semi-open world with a hub and spoke system (I think)

(3) Nope

(4) The previous two games could be completed in about 10 to 12 hours, but this one is supposedly longer

(5) Absolutely.

Thanks. Regarding #1, is the stealth anything to write home about or is it one of those games that goes for jack-of-all-trades-yet-master-of-none approaches seeing how the gunplay is servicable? 

 

Honestly, I'm interested because I'm starving for a good FPS but the whole aesthetic in the gameplay video I watched on page 1 of this thread is something I'd have to get over. It reminds me way too much of Fallout. 

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2 minutes ago, Bloodporne said:

Thanks. Regarding #1, is the stealth anything to write home about or is it one of those games that goes for jack-of-all-trades-yet-master-of-none approaches seeing how the gunplay is servicable? 

The stealth is also "servicable" :p

 

The fact of the matter is that Metro 2033 and Metro Last Light excel in just about every other area except for actual gameplay.

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17 minutes ago, SFLUFAN said:

The stealth is also "servicable" :p

 

The fact of the matter is that Metro 2033 and Metro Last Light excel in just about every other area except for actual gameplay.

You couldn't have possibly picked a more succinct way to un-sell me on this entire series haha

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Rock, Paper, Shotgun

Regardless of its limitations, Exodus still deserves its place among its underground comrades. In many ways it’s better, and I’m very glad they didn’t just repeat the same subterranean journey again. And yet, for the studio, this installment might also turn out to be a fabulous curse. Because if there are any further shooters set in the Metroverse, they’ll won’t be able to return to a life of tunnel vision. Not when we’ve seen Metro is capable of so much more.

 

Windows Central - 90%

Exodus's combat has room for improvement, particularly when it comes to enemy A.I. behavior. The gunplay is tight and well-built, with an emphasis on customization, allowing you to play how you want to play.

 

Cheat Code Central - 90%

A voice to go with Artyom’s soul would have been nice, as well as some AI tweaking, but the thoughtful additions and improvements from previous Metro games gives Exodus a fresh experience for anyone ready for a wild train ride.

 

PushSquare - 60%

While Metro: Exodus delivers on its promise of deep and meaningful combat situations that let you approach encounters from any angle you can think of, its technical shortcomings are simply unforgivable. Combine that with a plot that doesn’t answer its most intriguing questions and you’ve got an experience that will please at times, but will also disappoint those looking for something meaningful outside of the distribution of bullets.

 

COGConnected - 76%

As you might be sensing, Metro Exodus makes me feel severely conflicted. On one hand, I appreciate the characters and atmosphere, but on the other, I think it needed some more time. Features like individual volume sliders for voices and music are missing, the general button layout is awkward, and button presses don’t always respond as I’d expect. Mix that in with the bugs, and we have a package that has the structure for excellence but was set loose on the world too soon. In my heart, I have strong feelings for Exodus, but I’ll forever be haunted by how outstanding a few more layers of polish could’ve made it.

 

Game Informer - 87.5%

Metro Exodus largely succeeds in its ambitions. The freeform sandboxes give players more agency to play how they want to play, and the smart level design and well-tuned pacing keep the experience feeling fresh throughout the campaign. The story may suffer from weak acting and 4A’s decision to keep Artyom a silent protagonist, but these shortcomings don’t stop me from recommending the game to both newcomers and series fans.

 

IGN - 85%

Metro Exodus takes the fear-inducing formula of the series and transplants it into expansive, sandbox-like levels without losing any of the oppressive tension that makes the Metro games memorable and distinctive among post-apocalyptic first-person shooters. It’s a frequently exhilarating and densely atmospheric journey across a Russian dystopia brimming with detail and deadly inhabitants, and well worth the trip for its consistently effective use of survival horror and hair-raising action.

 

VG247

A brilliant sequel that wrestles control away a little too often

 

Xbox Achievements - 85%

Metro Exodus might not be perfect, but it’s an excellent sequel that takes the series in a brave new direction, without losing the spirit of what makes the Metro games unique.

 

USgamer - 70%

Metro Exodus is a solid conclusion for a cult series that made its name in rough charm. The open world and stealth systems of the conclusion to the trilogy are largely missteps, but it's when Metro Exodus returns to its horrific roots, with a bunch of caring comrades, that the game fires on all cylinders.

 

Destructoid - 70%

Metro Exodus is a tour-de-force in apocalyptic exploration. It offers a rich, evolving world, brought to life with stunning visuals, immersive sound and ghastly creatures. These thrills and chills are irritatingly tempered with menial tasks, poor voice acting, dull stealth and a soulless hero, all of which prevent Metro Exodus from achieving its true potential. Behind these grievances, however, lies a thrilling adventure for anyone who dares board The Aurora. Just prepare to get your ticket punched.

 

VideoGamer - 70%

Metro Exodus injects life and light into the series, but its mechanics are still starting to creak; it's a good end to Artyom's journey, even if the story seems muffled.

 

PC Gamer - 78%

An incredible trip through a stunning post-apocalyptic world, let down by some uninspiring FPS combat.

 

PCGamesN - 80%

Pulling its inspirations from across videogames, this radioactive romp is the strongest in the series, and one of the best post-apocalyptic games ever made.

 

Guardian - 80%

The latest in the survivalist shooter game series takes you out of Moscow on a touching, tragic and engaging journey.

 

PC Invasion - 80%

Although far from perfect, Metro Exodus provides a breathtaking game experience across a post-nuclear apocalyptic world.

 

Eurogamer - "Recommended"

Far from just another map-clearing game, Metro's first above-ground outing is an atmospheric, characterful voyage across a ruined Russia.

 

Gamespot - 80%

As Metro broadens its horizons, it loses some of the series' focus. But Exodus makes up for it with thrilling encounters and a crew you'll want to follow to the ends of the earth.

 

Twinfinite - 80%

The survival horror tropes, linear moments, and emphasis on atmosphere haven't been lost, but Exodus proves that Metro can be much more than a journey through dark and decaying tunnels

 

GamingBolt - 80%

Metro Exodus is an ambitious sequel that retains the best parts of its predecessors, while also expanding upon their ideas in significant ways. A general lack of polish hurts those ambitions somewhat, but in the end, this is a game that is well worth the price of entry.

 

Gaming Nexus - 80%

Aside from some technical issues and a somewhat predicable story, Metro Exodus is a fun FPS with beautiful locations, lovable characters and a decent ending to Artyom's story.

 

Hardcore Gamer - 80%

Metro Exodus proves that after a six year break this franchise is just as relevant and enjoyable as ever

 

Worth Playing - 80%

Metro Exodus is an absolutely solid, all-around experience. Although the change from indoor to outdoor scenery is striking at first, it allows the gameplay to breathe and feel different from previous titles. The signature makeshift guns are paired well with the new crafting ability, and their lack of stopping power makes firefights meaningful and stealth sections tense. There are still issues here and there, and the presentation could be tighter, but this is a worthy sequel to a game that has earned its cult status throughout the years.

 

Attack of the Fanboy - 60%

Following off the stellar Metro 2033 and Last Light, Exodus feels like a misstep for this series. This series has built a reputation on its quality, but Exodus falls flat in some ways that truly matter.

 

We Got This Covered - 70%

Metro Exodus has potential in spades, but the bigger canvas exacerbates its uneven edges and the story is layered on too thick, robbing the world of mystery.

 

GamesRadar+ - 90%

A first-person survival shooter that's as engrossing as it is unnerving, Metro Exodus tells a powerfully human story in a world that's equal parts style and substance.

 

Screen Rant - 90%

The crowning achievement of the series, offering a post-apocalyptic experience that's terrifying.

 

Wccftech - 90%

All in all, Metro Exodus is a fantastic game that you'd be worse off for missing out.

 

EGM - 70%

The journey of Metro Exodus is more rollercoaster than train ride, with peaks and troughs rather than a steady level of quality throughout. Its technical issues make the product feel rushed, but these are worth suffering for a series that's ultimately heading down the right track.

 

Press Start - 70%

Metro Exodus shows some heart, and it's clear the developers have poured a lot into this third chapter of Artyom's story. Unfortunately, there are a lot of things that keep the game from hitting the standard set by its predecessors. Pacing is hamstrung by the ambitious misfire of an 'open-world', while performance issues and glitches mar much of Exodus.

 

PlayStation Universe - 85%

Metro Exodus is an amazing and beautiful game that offers a new style and experience from 2033 and Last Light. With polished visuals and an amazing soundtrack, the changes 4A Games have implemented create awesome environments and enjoyable gameplay, taking you across various landscapes of Europe. However, in doing so, the survival horror and dark, claustrophobic tone have almost entirely been left behind at the station.

 

GameSkinny - 90%

Metro Exodus, 4A's new first-person shooter, is almost a perfect game, introducing exciting new elements while still offering the classic Metro experience.

 

Game Revolution - 80%

I sincerely hope that with some patches the rough edges of Metro Exodus can be worked out. It’s almost there but has just enough technical issues to cause some frustration.

 

Kotaku - 30 Hours with Metro Exodus (Impressions)

I won’t beat around the glowing green bush: I’ve spent multiple hours of my time with Exodus absolutely infuriated. But I’ve soldiered on and witnessed the game redeem itself multiple times over. Sometimes, that’s meant a stellar mission full of action and tension and drama and fury. Other times, it was a weird little open-world interaction, like the time I got a pack of dog-like mutants, humanoid mutants, and human bandits to all fight each other instead of baring their rabid fangs at me. Most often, though, it’s been environments and characters that have bandaged my bleeding enthusiasm for the game.

 

TheSixthAxis - 90%

Metro Exodus provides an immersive FPS experience that marks a new milestone for the franchise. Its survival-horror, sandbox and shooter elements are remarkably well balanced, constituting an engaging and thrilling game that’ll leave you no stranger to a good jump scare

 

Polygon - A franchise built on darkness now flirts with optimism and hope

There have always been shades of gray in the Metro franchise, but until now the darker shades dominated its emotional and moral landscapes. Metro Exodus is more of an overcast spring afternoon. On my journey aboard the Aurora, I encounter pockets of humanity that have already lost hope. But on this train, beside my friends and family, there’s still hope yet.

 

Ars Technica

Do you like a game whose combat and discovery mechanics are entirely divorced from stop-and-wait delivery of lengthy, meandering dialogue, always spoken by over-eager actors with thick Eastern European accents? If so, you're in for some genuinely likable moments of character development; they're just firmly nestled in the kinds of overlong stories that might have you saying "get on with it, man" after a while. The spoilable plot beats, on the other hand, feel like fine B-movie cheese. Sometimes, these are full of scare-quote "important" messages freighted with fromage. (And sometimes filled with comically intense evil, too.)

 

Game Rant - 70%

Metro Exodus does a decent job at blending the franchise's stealth/shooter gameplay with semi-open world environments, but still falls short of its predecessors.

 

GameCrate - 92.5%

Metro Exodus is a masterful execution of a dying breed of video game: the measured, finely tuned, linear single player action game. From start to finish it’s an amazing thrill ride that rarely takes a moment to catch its breath and it lacks the bloated filler that plague so many other games these days. Instead, Metro Exodus is all meat from head to toe and it’s well worth the time.

 

CGMagazine - 80%

Now, I have some issues with Metro: Exodus. The larger story is completely off the wall ludicrous and makes everything that came before feel completely invalid. If I had been forced to live in a hole for 20 years, fight monsters and Nazis, and it was all a lie, I’m certainly not letting the people lying about it on my freedom train, much less call any shots. The smaller, more personal stories, however, often hit a little closer to home, and make life just a bit more interesting.

 

Gamers Heroes - 60%

Metro Exodus has the potential to be a solid game, but it just isn't there in its current state. Those on the fence best wait for a few patches before picking this one up.

 

Shacknews - 80%

Metro Exodus is best when it follows the classic Metro formula, painting the world with tension as you dive deeper into the darkness of the world. While the game does suffer with a bit of an identity crisis at times, at the end of it all, the tension and fear that is peppered throughout more than makes the journey worth the trouble as players get their first look at a much bigger world and the dangers that lie within it.

 

Metro GameCentral - 90%

The best post-apocalyptic survival game of the generation, that innovates in terms of both its varied gameplay mechanics and its incisive storytelling.

 

Fandom - 80%

Fluctuating like a Geiger Counter between nihilism and utopianism, this game’s muddy morality is a thing of beauty in the current climate and could be one of 2019’s most important games as a result.

 

Stevivor - 75%

Metro Exodus feels like a solid simulacrum of someone else trying to make a Fallout game, for all the benefits and drawbacks that entails

 

AngryCentaurGaming - "Buy"

 

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I really like the first two. Tempted to pick this up now as it sounds like I’ll like it. I was initially stoked for it and then the press seemed to be lukewarm on it with preview builds. 

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Would it be ok to play this one without having played the previous two games?  Lush, lovingly constructed single-player games are really all I want to play these days, but I don't have time to play the first two to catch up on the story.

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Single player FPS games are hard for me to get into. Halo is a major exception.

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9 hours ago, ShreddieMercuryRising said:

Would it be ok to play this one without having played the previous two games? 

I'm sure you'll be fine and you can probably find a story recap for 2033 and Last Light on YouTube.

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I have played a few hours of the first Metro (I think? It was one of them that wasn't Last Light, but I own two "Redux" titles on PS4, but I think there was an earlier Redux that i don't have?) and I enjoyed it for what it was, but I stopped after getting to the first town/hub/whatever.  I don't remember it being an open-world game, so I am guessing Exodus is either an open-world game or a semi-open-world game?  Are only certain parts open-world?  How does the story progress if only certain parts are open-world... does it go back and forth between linear and open-world?  How does the game move on from the open-world sections if it does go back and forth?  I saw something about the "Aurora" moving on for story progression?  What is that?

 

If this isn't like Fallout of Far Cry, then is it more like Halo with customizable weapons?  When I play games like Fallout, Far Cry, and even Skyrim... I tend to play kinda stealthy until I am "found out" and then I just try to kill things as quickly as possible and then move on.  The high reviews make me want to try the game out, but I sort of want to run through the previous games, but if the gameplay is different enough I am not sure if it will matter if I play the previous games.

 

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More reviews:

 

Rock, Paper, Shotgun

Regardless of its limitations, Exodus still deserves its place among its underground comrades. In many ways it’s better, and I’m very glad they didn’t just repeat the same subterranean journey again. And yet, for the studio, this installment might also turn out to be a fabulous curse. Because if there are any further shooters set in the Metroverse, they’ll won’t be able to return to a life of tunnel vision. Not when we’ve seen Metro is capable of so much more.

 

Easy Allies - 85%

 

Slant Magazine - 60%

Exodus’s sweeping critique of humanity is practically nuance-free. Here, dissent among followers is rare, cultists are unquestioning fanatics, and cannibals screech “MEAT!” and jot the word down in unintentionally hilarious diary pages. Even slaves uniformly cower before their masters, weeping and begging for sympathy. Despite introducing an open world, the game is very much a forward journey, barely spending enough time in one place to inject any complexity to its exploration of how society claws its way back from the brink. You’ll hear the leaders of each group speak but seldom the people who follow them. They have no more voice than Artyom, no more interiority. Just as Artyom is essentially an anonymous pair of floating hands, the people that his party encounters often represent little more than simplistic avatars of a post-apocalyptic society gone mad. Exodus ultimately seems less interested in the process of how humanity breaks down than its grisly end results.

 

GameZone - 80%

Despite shortcomings like a rather by the numbers level of quality of side missions, poor performance both visually and audibly, Metro Exodus still manages to deliver a compelling experience. Thanks to its meaty crafting and gun customization, a beautiful character-driven story focused more on humans than the fantastical, and a world built around fear, desolation, and tension, Exodus will definitely be one of 2019's most talked about games by the end of the year.

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19 hours ago, Pent said:

I have played a few hours of the first Metro (I think? It was one of them that wasn't Last Light, but I own two "Redux" titles on PS4, but I think there was an earlier Redux that i don't have?) and I enjoyed it for what it was, but I stopped after getting to the first town/hub/whatever.  I don't remember it being an open-world game, so I am guessing Exodus is either an open-world game or a semi-open-world game?  Are only certain parts open-world?  How does the story progress if only certain parts are open-world... does it go back and forth between linear and open-world?  How does the game move on from the open-world sections if it does go back and forth?  I saw something about the "Aurora" moving on for story progression?  What is that?

 

If this isn't like Fallout of Far Cry, then is it more like Halo with customizable weapons?  When I play games like Fallout, Far Cry, and even Skyrim... I tend to play kinda stealthy until I am "found out" and then I just try to kill things as quickly as possible and then move on.  The high reviews make me want to try the game out, but I sort of want to run through the previous games, but if the gameplay is different enough I am not sure if it will matter if I play the previous games.

 

Exodus is a semi-open world game, but it's probably best described as "wide linear" like the new God of War game.  The "Aurora" is a train that's used to advance the storyline from location to location.

 

Maybe @Nokt can help answer some of your other question as he is playing the PC version.

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23 hours ago, Pent said:

I have played a few hours of the first Metro (I think? It was one of them that wasn't Last Light, but I own two "Redux" titles on PS4, but I think there was an earlier Redux that i don't have?) and I enjoyed it for what it was, but I stopped after getting to the first town/hub/whatever.  I don't remember it being an open-world game, so I am guessing Exodus is either an open-world game or a semi-open-world game?  Are only certain parts open-world?  How does the story progress if only certain parts are open-world... does it go back and forth between linear and open-world?  How does the game move on from the open-world sections if it does go back and forth?  I saw something about the "Aurora" moving on for story progression?  What is that?

 

If this isn't like Fallout of Far Cry, then is it more like Halo with customizable weapons?  When I play games like Fallout, Far Cry, and even Skyrim... I tend to play kinda stealthy until I am "found out" and then I just try to kill things as quickly as possible and then move on.  The high reviews make me want to try the game out, but I sort of want to run through the previous games, but if the gameplay is different enough I am not sure if it will matter if I play the previous games.

I've only played a few hours so I'll give you what information I can.

 

2033 and Last Light are very much linear games while Exodus is a semi open world game (at least so far). There are some linear levels in Exodus like the opening couple missions, but for the most part once I got to the first area I can pretty much do whatever I want. Not that combat has really changed drastically, Metro always did promote itself as a approach the situation however you wanted. You can be completely passive if you want and just knock people out, you can sneak around and assassinate everyone, or you can just go in guns a blazing and that doesn't change in Exodus. The only thing that really changes in that you aren't forced into these engagements anymore other than the main story missions.

 

Based on how you play Fallout, Far Cry,  and Skyrim, I think this would be right up your alley. If I had to associate it with a game I'd probably say Dishonored, Dishonored kind of has the same thing going where you can kind of choose how to approach situations and do what you want to do. Exodus does share a lot of similarities with Far Cry though through crafting systems, weapon mods, side missions, etc. Honestly its a hard toss up between a couple games.

 

The opening missions of the game involves you getting captured and escaping. You escape on a train that you wind up naming the Aurora and the main quest you gain in the first open area is progressing the Aurora forward. You are also given 4 or 5 side quests that you can choose to complete or not. I haven't really progressed far enough to know if it switches between linearity and open world.

 

As far as the 2033 and Last Light go, they are more of a survival shooter with some light horror mixed in. Ammo is much more scarce, your forced into confrontations whether you have the ammo or not, its also much more linear, even in the battle engagements where it gives you a little more freedom to breath. Exodus doesn't do a lot of that, you can craft ammo and crafting materials are stupid easy to find. On top of that enemies also drop crafting materials and ammo, its like a never ending supply. Engagements are a lot more free in how you approach them, but still have a very similar feeling to them. So far I only have 3 weapons a pistol, assault rifle, and a pneumatic weapon. You can heavily mod the pistol into more of a shotgun, an SMG, or just a regular revolver and you can mod them at anytime. I know there are more weapons in the game, but I don't know if you can keep all of them in your backpack or if you have to make a choice in what you keep, which is how I think the original games worked.

 

As far as playing 2033/Last Light, I highly recommend playing them just based upon them being really good games. However, unless you do things a specific way you won't get the "canon" ending, which might confuse you a little jumping into the next game. You could just watch a refresher on Youtube and probably be in a better situation than if you actually played the games.

 

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After playing several hours of the game, and getting through the first "open" or "wide-linear" section, here are my impressions:

 

This is a fantastic looking game.  I'm playing on a base PS4, and it looks gorgeous.  The environmental design, lighting, and models look excellent, and there are lots of tiny details and flourishes when you look around that add to the atmosphere and immersive quality of the game.  The gameplay is slow, methodical, and intentional.  You constantly need to take stock of your resources, and since ammo is scarce, it's usually better to avoid combat, at least through the early part of the game.  The game is almost entirely focused on making you feel like you're fighting to survive a bleak and brutal environment; you have to craft and replace gas mask filters, manually charge your flashlight, and pull out your map and backpack in real-time without a pause menu.  Unlike RDR 2, in which I found similarly slow and deliberate mechanics boring, unnecessary, and at odds with the rest of the game, in Metro these things are essential in grounding you in the world.  They also have real consequences to the gameplay, and are not mindless window-dressing.  For example, you have to clean your guns, they will actually jam and experience significant drops in quality if you fail to do so.

 

I'd read a lot about how janky these games are, and while I certainly see some of that, I don't find them any more glitchy or bug-ridden than something like Skyrim or Fallout.  I switched the dialogue to Russian, which is interesting, but there is alot of cross-talk that can be hard to keep up with.  The weakest part of the game seems to be the script, and the VO delivery is occasionally mistimed.  But, those things aren't really detracting from my enjoyment of the game.  Through about 8 hours, there has been alot of interesting variety in the environments, and lots of cool scripted moments that happen organically while you're exploring the world.  I'm really enjoying my time with it, and would recommend it to anybody who enjoys single-player FPS games.  Also, I haven't played any of the previous Metro games, but there is a really well-done in-game recap that goes over the main plot points at the beginning, so lack of exposure to the previous games shouldn't be a deterrent from this one.

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