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What if a super-powered kid from outer space landed outside a farm and was raised by Americans...but was evil? [Brightburn]


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7 hours ago, Brick said:

What the fuck is Irredeemable, Supreme Power, and Planetary, and all these other things you guys are talking about? 

 

irredeemable is a comic where a superman like character snaps one day and starts murdering everyone. The first half is fantastic the second is just so so.

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12 hours ago, Brick said:

What the fuck is Irredeemable, Supreme Power, and Planetary, and all these other things you guys are talking about? 

 

Supreme Power is basically Marvel taking the Justice League and doing them Marvel Style. There's been several incarnations of the group and DC has actually taken some of those storylines and incorporated them in to their actual Justice League comic. Planetary is a deconstruction of the Bronze and Silver age of comics via three "Planetary Investigators" who uncover the secrets of Super heroes and how they've shaped the world behind the scenes. A Fantastic Four like group is the main villains. Great book.

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I completely forgot about The Reckoners. Imagine a moon sized meteor that parks itself on Earth's atmosphere--it then randomly gives a number of people superhuman abilities. The more those people use those abilities, the more evil they become. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. 

 

A small band of un-altered humans try to stop them. 

 

It's awesome. 

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3 hours ago, Emblazon said:

I completely forgot about The Reckoners. Imagine a moon sized meteor that parks itself on Earth's atmosphere--it then randomly gives a number of people superhuman abilities. The more those people use those abilities, the more evil they become. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. 

 

A small band of un-altered humans try to stop them. 

 

It's awesome. 

 

That's a comic? Never heard of it.

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10 hours ago, Emblazon said:

It's a series of novels, by Brandon Sanderson. The first book is called Steelheart. I highly recommend it. 

 

 

Just be aware that it's a young adult series. I'm not saying to avoid it for that reason, but just be aware that it's written more simply than some of his other stuff. I got about 1/3 or 1/2 of the way through and wasn't really enjoying it, so I shelved it. 

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43 minutes ago, CitizenVectron said:

 

 

Just be aware that it's a young adult series. I'm not saying to avoid it for that reason, but just be aware that it's written more simply than some of his other stuff. I got about 1/3 or 1/2 of the way through and wasn't really enjoying it, so I shelved it. 

That's like saying you read half of Sorcerer's Stone and never went back because you didn't like that it took place in England. It's doing a huge diservice to both the franchise and yourself.

 

Also, I'm rather curious--what writing style dictates "young adult"? Is it only considered to be "high literature" when big boy words that require a dictionary are used? Or is it something dreadful that requires 3 pages of straight existential exposition... because only an adult would be dense enough to dredge through that. 

 

I can see "intended for a younger audience", but then you're still riding a fine line. Take Ratatouille, for example--is it a movie intended for kids? Absolutely. Would it be considered a kid's movie? Absolutely not. 

 

I've tried to get through Way of Kings on two separate occasions, and stopped at nearly the exact same place both times--and it had nothing to do with the writing style, but everything to do with the horrible plot structure. While the book may amount to something at some point, the first couple hundred pages do little to establish anything of substance. 

 

And while it may seem like I'm doing something similar by writing off Way of Kings, I'm choosing to do so not because of writing style, but because the story is an incomprehensible mess. Shit, Game of Thrones has a better structure than Way of Kings... and that's saying something. :lol:

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3 minutes ago, Emblazon said:

That's like saying you read half of Sorcerer's Stone and never went back because you didn't like that it took place in England. It's doing a huge diservice to both the franchise and yourself.

 

Also, I'm rather curious--what writing style dictates "young adult"? Is it only considered to be "high literature" when big boy words that require a dictionary are used? Or is it something dreadful that requires 3 pages of straight existential exposition... because only an adult would be dense enough to dredge through that. 

 

I can see "intended for a younger audience", but then you're still riding a fine line. Take Ratatouille, for example--is it a movie intended for kids? Absolutely. Would it be considered a kid's movie? Absolutely not. 

 

I've tried to get through Way of Kings on two separate occasions, and stopped at nearly the exact same place both times--and it had nothing to do with the writing style, but everything to do with the horrible plot structure. While the book may amount to something at some point, the first couple hundred pages do little to establish anything of substance. 

 

And while it may seem like I'm doing something similar by writing off Way of Kings, I'm choosing to do so not because of writing style, but because the story is an incomprehensible mess. Shit, Game of Thrones has a better structure than Way of Kings... and that's saying something. :lol:

People seem pretty sensitive about the YA label on books they read.  I don't think there was anything malicious in @CitizenVectron 's comment.  

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1 minute ago, number305 said:

People seem pretty sensitive about the YA label on books they read.  I don't think there was anything malicious in @CitizenVectron 's comment.  

I'm sure my response came back harsher than intended, but I was trying to make the distinction between stopping reading a book because you weren't into the story, versus stopping a book because you didn't feel the writing style stimulated your intellect enough. 

 

If the latter is the case, well, there goes 98% of comics ever written. 

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7 minutes ago, Emblazon said:

That's like saying you read half of Sorcerer's Stone and never went back because you didn't like that it took place in England. It's doing a huge diservice to both the franchise and yourself.

 

Also, I'm rather curious--what writing style dictates "young adult"? Is it only considered to be "high literature" when big boy words that require a dictionary are used? Or is it something dreadful that requires 3 pages of straight existential exposition... because only an adult would be dense enough to dredge through that. 

 

I can see "intended for a younger audience", but then you're still riding a fine line. Take Ratatouille, for example--is it a movie intended for kids? Absolutely. Would it be considered a kid's movie? Absolutely not. 

 

I've tried to get through Way of Kings on two separate occasions, and stopped at nearly the exact same place both times--and it had nothing to do with the writing style, but everything to do with the horrible plot structure. While the book may amount to something at some point, the first couple hundred pages do little to establish anything of substance. 

 

And while it may seem like I'm doing something similar by writing off Way of Kings, I'm choosing to do so not because of writing style, but because the story is an incomprehensible mess. Shit, Game of Thrones has a better structure than Way of Kings... and that's saying something. :lol:

I think the author and publisher normally determine whether or not something is “young adult” based on the intended audience of the books.

 

Also Ratatouille and all the Pixar films are absolutely “kids movies” even though they have appeal beyond that.

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13 minutes ago, Emblazon said:

I'm sure my response came back harsher than intended, but I was trying to make the distinction between stopping reading a book because you weren't into the story, versus stopping a book because you didn't feel the writing style stimulated your intellect enough. 

 

If the latter is the case, well, there goes 98% of comics ever written. 

 

I said I stopped reading because I didn't enjoy it, not because it's YA. I just warned about YA as some people don't enjoy them because of the stuff that usually comes with them (not always) like teenage love triangles, etc.

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I mean I think a less complicated vocabulary and easier to read pace are in fact what dictates a Young Adult book. As well as certain general themes. Also for some reason the print is usually bigger with more spacing in between. Not sure why since for the most part young adults have excellent near sighted vision lol

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21 hours ago, Kal-El814 said:

Also Ratatouille and all the Pixar films are absolutely “kids movies” even though they have appeal beyond that.

 

They aren't childrens' or kids' films, they are family films. It's important to make the distinction between entertainment created for kids/children, and entertainment created for the entire family to enjoy. Childrens entertainment is different from family entertaintment. Pixar films are for the whole family, meaning everyone of any age can find something to enjoy in a Pixar film. Illumination studio efforts like the recent Grinch movie are more for kids than families. Kubo and the Two Strings = for all audiences/all ages. The Secret Life of Pets = for children.

 

That's why we as adults in our 20's and 30's watch and are able to enjoy Pixar films (or Kubo, etc.), but few of us bother with The Grinch or The Secret Life of Pets (unless we ourselves have kids and are forced to watch it). :p 

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1 hour ago, Kal-El814 said:

Adults fucking love The Grinch for real. I don’t disagree generally though, but I think family films generally and Pixar films specifically skew to kids much more than they do to adults. 

 

I agree it is a sliding scale, but you do see my point. Talking about how family entertainment skews, well, I'd agree even Pixar films of course skew children (family entertainment by default has to) but there are distinctions to be made within that field, as in my previous post. :) 

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