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Mega-analysis of studies following 1.4 million people for 30 years shows red & processed meat linked to heart disease, no issues with poultry


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WWW.CNN.COM

Eating beef, lamb, pork and processed meats will increase your risk of coronary heart disease later in life, but poultry doesn't appear to raise risk, the largest review of all large-scale studies to date revealed.

 

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For each 1.75 ounces (50 grams) of beef, lamb and pork eaten, the risk of coronary heart disease rose 9%. A recommended serving of meat is about 3 ounces (85 grams), the size of bar of soap or deck of cards, according to the American Cancer Society.


For each 1.75 ounces (50 grams) of processed meats such as bacon, ham or sausage that were eaten, the risk rose by 18%.

 

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Take a restaurant dinner of a typical cut of beef as an example. Filets, sirloins, strip and rib eye steaks eaten at a steakhouse can weight between 9 and 12 ounces (255 to 340 grams). That means you could easily consume about 5 to 7 ounces (142 to 198 grams) of beef in a single meal. 

 

I feel like I knew this, but I guess the large-scale review of it puts it into sharper focus.

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Now can any of this also be linked to hormones that were introduced to the feed to make livestock bigger? With everything now being advertised a GMO free and free of whatever else they were fed.  I know red meat is bad, but sometimes you just wanna rip into a chunk of red meat to satisfy your inner beast. I do love chicken, but sometimes you just need that something something

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I wish CNN's link to the study itself was broken.

 

What I'm unclear about is "For each 1.75 ounces (50 grams) of beef, lamb and pork eaten, the risk of coronary heart disease rose 9%."

Does this mean that every 1.75 ounces you eat period? Or every 1.75 ounces per week? Like, does this compound?

 

And reading down into it, it seems that the impact is from saturated fats and sodium. 

 

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Red and processed meat linked to increased risk of heart disease, Oxford study shows

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Currently in the UK, about 10 in 100 people would be expected to eventually die from coronary heart disease.3 Based on the findings from the present study and current red and processed meat intakes in the UK,4 if all these 100 people reduced their unprocessed red meat intake by three-quarters (for example from four times a week to one time a week), or if they stopped consuming processed meat altogether, deaths from coronary heart disease would decrease from 10 in 100 down to 9 in 100.

The studies involved in this analysis were mostly based on white adults living in Europe or the USA. The research team say more data are needed to examine these associations in other populations, including East Asia and Africa.

As far as I can tell, the journal this was published in is behind a paywall.  So, I haven't been able to read it.

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I've heard before that you should have no more than 500g of red meat per week. Cold cuts like salami are carcinogenic, yet they're so tasty. 

 

How much can a well balanced diet and active lifestyle counteract these though? Did the study take into account the lifestyle of each person? Of course not, and I'm sure a lot were already at a high risk of heart disease and cancer because of things like obesity. 

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13 minutes ago, sblfilms said:

Living a long time is highly overrated 

 

Healthspan is what people should focus on, not just lifespan. If that leads to a longer lifespan as well then that's a bonus. Would I love to live to 115? Yes, but not if for the last 20 years I'm in a nursing home barely functioning mentally and physically. Both my dad's parents, and my mom's mother were in nursing homes towards the ends of their lives, and it is absolutely not the way I want to go. It's depressing. 

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1 minute ago, Brick said:

 

Healthspan is what people should focus on, not just lifespan. If that leads to a longer lifespan as well then that's a bonus. Would I love to live to 115? Yes, but not if for the last 20 years I'm in a nursing home barely functioning mentally and physically. Both my dad's parents, and my mom's mother were in nursing homes towards the ends of their lives, and it is absolutely not the way I want to go. It's depressing. 


Health isn’t even the primary thing for me with having no desire to live into very old age. Society passes you by. Culture evolves beyond you.

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41 minutes ago, sblfilms said:


Health isn’t even the primary thing for me with having no desire to live into very old age. Society passes you by. Culture evolves beyond you.

 

Perhaps to some extent. But while culture continues to advance today (perhaps faster than ever before), we also now have the ability to easily access items/content from past culture much more easily. So when we're 90 years old (and if still healthy and with it), we might not like the musical trend of the 2060's robowave, but we'll still be able to listen to the music we like, or access the types of books we like, etc. And of course some bits of new culture are still appreciated and enjoyed by new people.  

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1 hour ago, sblfilms said:

Living a long time is highly overrated 

 

My grandpa suffered for 20 years after doctors saved his life following a heart attack and stroke.  His life was horrible between that time and when he died in 2013.  

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1 hour ago, CitizenVectron said:

 

Perhaps to some extent. But while culture continues to advance today (perhaps faster than ever before), we also now have the ability to easily access items/content from past culture much more easily. So when we're 90 years old (and if still healthy and with it), we might not like the musical trend of the 2060's robowave, but we'll still be able to listen to the music we like, or access the types of books we like, etc. And of course some bits of new culture are still appreciated and enjoyed by new people.  


I spend a lot of time with old people and even the very healthy and mentally fit ones just don’t have a lot of things that motivate joy and happiness in life. Certainly that isn’t all of our elderly people, but it is terribly common. 
 

It’s like those nights when you’re flipping through things on Netflix and you feel like you’ve seen all the things you want to see, so the only thing to do I go back and watch that show you’ve seen a million times.

 

I’m sure that is satisfying to some people, but it’s not the kind of life I’m looking forward to!

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