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The "Great Resignation" gains momentum as "return to work" plans take effect (CNBC)


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WWW.CNBC.COM

In the wake of the Covid pandemic, a growing number of workers are rethinking what they want in a job and a lifestyle.

 

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In what’s been dubbed the “Great Resignation,” a whopping 95% of workers are now considering changing jobs, and 92% are even willing to switch industries to find the right position, according to a recent report by jobs site Monster.com. 

 

Most say burnout and lack of growth opportunities are what is driving the shift, Monster found. 

 

“When we were in the throes of the pandemic, so many people buckled down, now what we’re seeing is a sign of confidence,” said Scott Blumsack, senior vice president of research and insights at Monster.

 

 

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Haven't read the article yet (olol) but to be fair, asking people on Monster if they're looking to change jobs is like asking people on Tinder if they're looking to hook up. :p

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37 minutes ago, Nokra said:

Haven't read the article yet (olol) but to be fair, asking people on Monster if they're looking to change jobs is like asking people on Tinder if they're looking to hook up. :p


No, it’s just that literally every working adult in America hates their job.

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9 hours ago, SuperSpreader said:

There's no upwards mobility because boomers have blocked it. 

So what, they give up their jobs to make young people happy? 

I don't think there's a real solution to that problem right now.

And im not saying you're wrong, but they aren't wrong for not wanting to retire either.

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26 minutes ago, BloodyHell said:

So what, they give up their jobs to make young people happy? 

I don't think there's a real solution to that problem right now.

And im not saying you're wrong, but they aren't wrong for not wanting to retire either.

 

They could stop blocking new housing. 

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The pandemic should have been more of an inflection point than it’ll ultimately end up being. How much real estate, how much land is tied up in giving humans an unnecessary place to work for 40-60 hours a week? How many jobs were lost while the net worth of anyone with meaningful investment in the stock market or real estate increased, dramatically in many cases? How much unnecessary work was being done?

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13 minutes ago, CitizenVectron said:

The explanation is easy—someone who is 21 still has fun at work, even if the job is shitty, because they are generally surrounded by like-minded peers. Someone in their 40s is sick of working and the corporate environment, and is jaded.


By 27, I was so jaded I could hardly function at work. I had to go get therapy just to give a fuck again.

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12 minutes ago, Uaarkson said:


By 27, I was so jaded I could hardly function at work. I had to go get therapy just to give a fuck again.

 

I've seen this so often, and have made a conscious effort to take jobs at places with great work culture, and with great teams. So far it's worked out. I was recently head-hunted for a cool job, but I turned it down because the culture was different (offer was at a full-stack startup with sprint schedules, etc, compared to my current IT job in public education). I don't need to love my job, but I want to be able to at least tolerate it so that I can make money and enjoy the rest of my life.

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4 minutes ago, CitizenVectron said:

 

I've seen this so often, and have made a conscious effort to take jobs at places with great work culture, and with great teams. So far it's worked out. I was recently head-hunted for a cool job, but I turned it down because the culture was different (offer was at a full-stack startup with sprint schedules, etc, compared to my current IT job in public education). I don't need to love my job, but I want to be able to at least tolerate it so that I can make money and enjoy the rest of my life.

 

I did 4 years at a large health insurance company.  Every once in a while one of their recruiters will call me and I'll tell them my salary expectations for that position is a firm $125k and the job probably caps at around $70 to $85k.  They tell me I'm being absurd, I tell them their company is awful and I'd rather work elsewhere for less, but that's the minimum I'll take if I'm going to hate where I work.

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1 minute ago, finaljedi said:

 

I did 4 years at a large health insurance company.  Every once in a while one of their recruiters will call me and I'll tell them my salary expectations for that position is a firm $125k and the job probably caps at around $70 to $85k.  They tell me I'm being absurd, I tell them their company is awful and I'd rather work elsewhere for less, but that's the minimum I'll take if I'm going to hate where I work.

 

 

 

"I am not negotiating. I am telling you how much you could offer me before I couldn't say no."

 

 

It's nice when you have this position because you both get to stick it to a shitty employer and don't have any pressure about trying to haggle. Take it it or leave it.

 

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1 hour ago, b_m_b_m_b_m said:

 

 

 

53 minutes ago, CitizenVectron said:

The explanation is easy—someone who is 21 still has fun at work, even if the job is shitty, because they are generally surrounded by like-minded peers. Someone in their 40s is sick of working and the corporate environment, and is jaded.

 

Younger people want to socialize and network. Older people are already networked and get social interaction from family.

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1 hour ago, Uaarkson said:


By 27, I was so jaded I could hardly function at work. I had to go get therapy just to give a fuck again.

 

I feel you. 35 and burnt out on work again. Am on disability at present. Probably will try to stay out for 6 months or so. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Interesting to see so much voluntary unemployment after a decade of high involuntary unemployment.  Although I wonder how the voluntarily unemployed can indefinitely maintain their cash flow to afford the basics without Biden bux.

 

Makes one think if everyone simply knew how easy it was to work from home in ‘08, and the government had spent the stimulus purely on expanded unemployment benefits, the Great Recession wouldn’t have been a big deal.

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We just had three important positions in my office quit within the last month. Two of them were here for about 5+ years to 10 years even. Two of those were because they got an offer with work-from-home options but slightly lower pay, the third is simply because he said working from home and coming back in here is like having a layer peeled back and seeing how insane the stress actually was all this time. I've had my personal 'what am I doing with my life?' moment in the winter and am planning on making a move myself within the next year.

 

I really fucking hope that this shifts things at least a little bit because the American workplace is an absurd nightmare. 

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I'm trying to not care as much for my own sanity. If it's not my decision or something I don't have control over I try to just give them exactly what they asked for and won't try and negotiate doing something better anymore. The fights and arguments aren't worth it. 

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3 hours ago, Signifyin(g)Monkey said:

Interesting to see so much voluntary unemployment after a decade of high involuntary unemployment.  Although I wonder how the voluntarily unemployed can indefinitely maintain their cash flow to afford the basics without Biden bux.


that’s why so many want to stop the Biden-bux, because they want to force people to need to make their morning latte and afternoon burgers. And they should do it for an unlivable wage, because they have to work at Burger King/McDonalds/Starbucks/etc. 

 

frankly, I’m glad to see the service class workers rise up and demand better. 

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