Jump to content

NASA announces first Astronauts that will ride atop Boeing and SpaceX rockets


Recommended Posts

Quote

NASA has announced the names of the first astronauts who’ll fly to the International Space Station on American-made, commercial spacecraft.

 

The crews will fly to the space station on rockets built by NASA  commercial partners Boeing and SpaceX. “Today, our country’s dreams of greater achievements in space are within our grasp,” said NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine, in a statement. “Today’s announcement advances our great American vision and strengthens the nation’s leadership in space.”

 

Nine astronauts were selected to crew the first test flights and missions of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon. 

 

“The men and women we assign to these first flights are at the forefront of this exciting new time for human spaceflight,” said Mark Geyer, director of NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, in a statement.

 

After each company completes their crewed test flights successfully, NASA will start the process to finally certify the spacecraft and systems for regular crew missions to the space station.

 

So far, NASA has contracted for six missions with each company, with as many as four astronauts crewing each commercial spacecraft.

https://techcrunch.com/2018/08/03/nasa-names-first-astronauts-for-the-inaugural-commercial-flights-to-the-iss/

 

SpaceX-PCM-resized-for-blog.pngBoeing-PCM-resized-for-blog-1200x960.png

 

EDIT:  I should clarify the headline:  Boeing's capsule will be riding atop a ULA built Atlas 5 rocket.  Boeing is a co-owner with Lockheed-Martin of ULA, which manufactures both the Atlas 5 and Delta 4 launch vehicles.  SpaceX's capsule will be riding atop their own rocket, the reusable Falcon 9.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Jwheel86 said:

Who's covering the cost difference between the Atlas and Falcon boosters? 

 

You are. :troll:

 

I guess NASA is mandating that although SpaceX can recover and reuse the boosters assigned to these missions, they cannot be reused for these missions.  Each manned flight will be on top of a brand new booster.  SpaceX is free to reuse the landed boosters for commercial missions and (non-manned) government missions if the customer agrees. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, mclumber1 said:

I guess NASA is mandating that although SpaceX can recover and reuse the boosters assigned to these missions, they cannot be reused for these missions.  Each manned flight will be on top of a brand new booster.  SpaceX is free to reuse the landed boosters for commercial missions and (non-manned) government missions if the customer agrees. 

 

Probably a good call for now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...