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Massdriver

Marrying Vega and Zen- APU reviews

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With the Ryzen 5 2400G, AMD has completely shut down the sub-$100 graphics card market. As a choice for gamers on a budget, those building systems in the region of $500, it becomes the processor to pick.

https://www.anandtech.com/show/12425/marrying-vega-and-zen-the-amd-ryzen-5-2400g-review/14

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We're impressed with Ryzen 5 2400G's overall performance story, especially in light of the chip's $170 price tag. It's a solid value paired with an inexpensive motherboard and a fast memory kit. As with APUs of the past, this processor gives you the ability to buy one chip without the expense of an add-in card. You can imagine the integration does some interesting things for builders and small form factors, too. Ryzen 5 2400G would be great in a mini-ITX box next to your TV.

 

AMD’s value pitch has long consisted of more cores for less money, and Raven Ridge brings that same philosophy to integrated graphics. The Ryzen 5 2400G is a surprisingly good processor for those looking for a capable gaming build on the lower end of today's pricing scale.

 

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http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-5-2400g-zen-vega-cpu-gpu,5467-11.html

 

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The Ryzen 3 2200G, on the other hand, is certainly a no-brainer for a hundred bucks. Dial back the resolution and eye candy a bit from our rather ambitious test settings, and the 2200G's integrated Vega 8 graphics should prove a fine first step into the world of PC gaming or a capable companion for folks on tight budgets. Enthusiasts on a shoestring will find solid CPU performance with fully unlocked multipliers to play with for an extra shot of oomph, too. That kind of freedom simply isn't available from entry-level Intel chips. Folks concerned about productivity alone will still want to consider the Core i3-8100, but the Ryzen 3 2200G will certainly be the superior do-it-all part, and it's easy to call it a TR Editor's Choice.

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https://techreport.com/review/33235/amd-ryzen-3-2200g-and-ryzen-5-2400g-processors-reviewed/12

 

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At this time though there is no better option if you are looking to build an affordable entry-level system that can also handle light gaming.

Editor's Choice

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/Ryzen_5_2400G_Vega_11/21.html

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58 minutes ago, mikechorney said:

Integrated graphics for games....  :lol:

It's not a joke if your graphics card craps out and you don't have a spare and use it as a springboard for a new motherboard or if you are trying to enter pc gaming right now . It costs 400-600 bucks for a 1060 right now.

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3 minutes ago, Massdriver said:

It's not a joke if your graphics card craps out and you don't have a spare and use it as a springboard for a new motherboard or if you are trying to enter pc gaming right now . It costs 400-600 bucks for a 1060 right now.

If my graphics card crapped out, I would play on a console.  There would be no way I would spring for a new MB to play PC games at 720p on low settings (with a lot of games not even being playable).

 

The graphics card bubble WILL pop.  Only an idiot would build a gaming PC now.

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1 hour ago, mikechorney said:

If my graphics card crapped out, I would play on a console.  There would be no way I would spring for a new MB to play PC games at 720p on low settings (with a lot of games not even being playable).

 

The graphics card bubble WILL pop.  Only an idiot would build a gaming PC now.

The results are quite impressive. We are talking a huge step forward from previous gen AMD APUs and Intel isn’t even in the same league. It isn’t for most of us here, but this will make some sense for home theatre PCs, entry level budget gaming PCs, office PCs, and emergency gaming PCs. Some people don’t want to wait. 

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2 hours ago, Massdriver said:

The results are quite impressive. We are talking a huge step forward from previous gen AMD APUs and Intel isn’t even in the same league. It isn’t for most of us here, but this will make some sense for home theatre PCs, entry level budget gaming PCs, office PCs, and emergency gaming PCs. Some people don’t want to wait. 

 

Let's not forget laptops. That's a spot where "good enough" is a lot more acceptable. 

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1 hour ago, Spork3245 said:

But how does it do with mining bitcoins?

:pratt: 

 

More like shitcoins!

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17 hours ago, mikechorney said:

If my graphics card crapped out, I would play on a console.  There would be no way I would spring for a new MB to play PC games at 720p on low settings (with a lot of games not even being playable).

 

The graphics card bubble WILL pop.  Only an idiot would build a gaming PC now.

 

The 2400G can max games out at 720p and play games at 1080p with medium/low settings. Learn about the thing you're trying to talk about.

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20 minutes ago, Reputator said:

 

The 2400G can max games out at 720p and play games at 1080p with medium/low settings. Learn about the thing you're trying to talk about.

Sorry about my hyperbole.  Spending ~$500 for a computer to play 1080p on low settings to is not a worthwhile use of gaming funds.  Better?

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3 hours ago, mikechorney said:

Sorry about my hyperbole.  Spending ~$500 for a computer to play 1080p on low settings to is not a worthwhile use of gaming funds.  Better?

 

That's a personal preference, as console vs PC always has been. I won't judge anyone taking the other option (or both). But what's the point of using that age-old argument to diminish the accomplishment of this APU? 1080p medium settings used to cost at least $200 for a discreet card ten years ago. Now it's built into a very capable CPU. Fail?

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24 minutes ago, Reputator said:

 

That's a personal preference, as console vs PC always has been. I won't judge anyone taking the other option (or both). But what's the point of using that age-old argument to diminish the accomplishment of this APU? 1080p medium settings used to cost at least $200 for a discreet card ten years ago. Now it's built into a very capable CPU. Fail?

It's a huge accomplishment for an APU --  but that isn't saying much.  For what its worth,  this APU will run circles around a 10-year old $200 graphics card.  However, it CAN do 1080P at low settings. 

 

If gaming isn't a priority for you, then this might be an option.  There is a reason most gaming-oriented hardware is GPU-strong, and utilizes high bandwidth memory.  You pick the right tool for the job.

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Is the on-board GPU getting close to 30fps in a lot of games on the highest details? The TPU review didn't state detail settings. If it's 30fps on the highest settings, then medium/low might get 60fps and then we're in playable territory for SFF system. But low profile discrete GPUs exist (I think there's a 1060 out there). Still impressive. Might be fine for some Overwatch and LoL and other games that aren't so demanding.

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12 hours ago, forsayken said:

Is the on-board GPU getting close to 30fps in a lot of games on the highest details? The TPU review didn't state detail settings. If it's 30fps on the highest settings, then medium/low might get 60fps and then we're in playable territory for SFF system. But low profile discrete GPUs exist (I think there's a 1060 out there). Still impressive. Might be fine for some Overwatch and LoL and other games that aren't so demanding.

It's getting about half the framerate of a 1050 based on the benchmarks above.  For Battlefield 1, it was getting in the 50's on low @1080p, Far Cry Primal it was getting in the mid-30s on low @1080p, GTAV it was getting mid-50s on low @1080p....  For GTAV ultra @1080p it was getting just under 20fos...

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Revisiting the value proposition of AMD's Ryzen 5 2400G

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Those building entry-level PCs might not have the luxury of choosing between productivity chops and gaming power, though. To make a gaming build with capabilities similar to those of the Ryzen 5 2400G, building a system around the Core i5-8400 quickly leads to a bottom line that's too expensive to really be considered budget-friendly. That's thanks to the need for an Nvidia GT 1030 like the one we employed with our test system. Those cards were $70 or $80 until just recently, but a mysterious shortage of them at e-tail has suddenly led to a jump in price.

 

Regardless, back-ordering one of those cards will run you $90 at Amazon right now, and even though we're rolling with that figure for the sake of argument, $90 is honestly too much to pay for a discrete card with the GT 1030's performance. If you had to buy one, we'd wait for prices to drop once stock levels return to normal.

 

To restore our system to something approaching budget-friendliness, we have to tap a Core i3-8100 for our Coffee Lake gaming system instead of the Core i5-8400, and that suddenly puts the CPU performance of our build behind that of the Ryzen 5 2400G in most applications.

 

That performance drop also comes on top of the fact that the Ryzen 5 2400G ahead of the GT 1030 in our all-important 99th-percentile frame-time index, meaning the AMD system will generally deliver a smoother gaming experience for a whopping $70 less. Even if we could employ a theoretical H360 or B360 Intel board for $60 or $70, we'd still not be getting better gaming performance on the whole than the Ryzen 5 APU would offer.

 

So there you have it: the Ryzen 5 2400G is a spectacularly balanced value for folks who want a no-compromises entry-level system, just like its Ryzen 3 sibling is at $100. Both CPUs were equally deserving of a TR Editor's Choice award for their blends of value and performance, and I'll be updating our review post-haste to reflect AMD's dominance in that department. Sorry for the goof, and I'll make a better effort to look before I leap in the future.

 

https://techreport.com/blog/33259/revisiting-the-value-proposition-of-amd-ryzen-5-2400g

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5 years ago people would be at full chub with an iGPU doing 720p/Max and 1080p/low-med, assuming of course you're that target audience.

 

This is an impressive chip. Just because you may not be interested in it, doesn't change that fact.

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1 minute ago, NextGen said:

5 years ago people would be at full chub with an iGPU doing 720p/Max and 1080p/low-med, assuming of course you're that target audience.

 

This is an impressive chip. Just because you may not be interested in it, doesn't change that fact.

100% agreed! This Chip has its place in a range of computing solutions. People love pushing the high end, but bring up the bottom end matters as well. 

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52 minutes ago, NextGen said:

5 years ago people would be at full chub with an iGPU doing 720p/Max and 1080p/low-med, assuming of course you're that target audience.

 

This is an impressive chip. Just because you may not be interested in it, doesn't change that fact.

 

49 minutes ago, Mr.Vic20 said:

100% agreed! This Chip has its place in a range of computing solutions. People love pushing the high end, but bring up the bottom end matters as well. 

 

Like I said above, this seems great for laptops, where a lot of the time being able to run something like Civ VI at decent settings is more than enough for the amount of gaming you intend to use the device for. The only thing really comparable in terms of this is Intel's Iris graphics, but that tends to wind up being in really expensive laptops due to Intel making you get a top-end CPU to get the Iris graphics, and laptop OEMs tending to make you pay for a bunch of other upgrades (RAM, etc) to get a top-end CPU. There's a ton to be said for increasing competition in this space in terms of laptops giving usable gaming performance without requiring a discrete GPU since not having a discrete GPU reduces weight and power draw.

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These are going to sell like..well, I guess like graphics cards for "gaming cafe" places that are focused on esport titles like DOTA.

 

It simplifies the setup, and is much cheaper to deploy.

 

As far as laptops, that's where the Intel+AMD relationship comes in. Power sipping U series Intel CPU's paired with (relatively speaking) high performance Vega graphics will shake up that market.

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3 hours ago, NextGen said:

These are going to sell like..well, I guess like graphics cards for "gaming cafe" places that are focused on esport titles like DOTA.

 

It simplifies the setup, and is much cheaper to deploy.

 

As far as laptops, that's where the Intel+AMD relationship comes in. Power sipping U series Intel CPU's paired with (relatively speaking) high performance Vega graphics will shake up that market.

I'm waiting on the U series and I'm leaning towards a Dell.

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