Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Andromeda

The origin of life on planet Earth

Recommended Posts

Andromeda    0

A "cloud" falls from infinite space. Then, in the crust of the planet, as in the depths of the primitive oceans, could be observed the existence of a viscous element that covered the whole Earth. With this gelatinous mass, protoplasm was born. This matter, amorphous and viscous, with its condensation gave origin to the birth of the nucleus. The earliest inhabitants of Earth are albuminoid cells, amoebae, and all unicellular organisms that have multiplied in the warm waters of the oceans. These beings only reveal a sense: of touch, which gave rise to all others.

cosmiccloud.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
apoc81    1,917
On 5/12/2017 at 0:58 PM, Andromeda said:

A "cloud" falls from infinite space. Then, in the crust of the planet, as in the depths of the primitive oceans, could be observed the existence of a viscous element that covered the whole Earth. With this gelatinous mass, protoplasm was born. This matter, amorphous and viscous, with its condensation gave origin to the birth of the nucleus. The earliest inhabitants of Earth are albuminoid cells, amoebae, and all unicellular organisms that have multiplied in the warm waters of the oceans. These beings only reveal a sense: of touch, which gave rise to all others.

cosmiccloud.jpg

Space isn't infinite. Stopped reading after your first sentence. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lucian04    5,276
On 5/24/2017 at 9:45 AM, apoc81 said:

Space isn't infinite. Stopped reading after your first sentence. 

 

The observable universe is definitely finite. We can only see up to a certain point. As far as the unobservable universe goes, nobody knows for sure if the universe is exactly infinite, least of all you. You might want to brush up on the Copernican principal and Euclidean space. The current known curvature of the universe is consistent with 0, so as far as we know, it could stretch for infinity, or there may be an actual end to the universe. We have no idea and we will probably never have an idea. From a topology of 0, due to inflation density, we wouldn't be able to measure the deviation of the curvature of the universe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
apoc81    1,917
18 hours ago, Lucian04 said:

 

The observable universe is definitely finite. We can only see up to a certain point. As far as the unobservable universe goes, nobody knows for sure if the universe is exactly infinite, least of all you. You might want to brush up on the Copernican principal and Euclidean space. The current known curvature of the universe is consistent with 0, so as far as we know, it could stretch for infinity, or there may be an actual end to the universe. We have no idea and we will probably never have an idea. From a topology of 0, due to inflation density, we wouldn't be able to measure the deviation of the curvature of the universe

The universe is constantly expanding, that means, in effect, it is not infinite. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lucian04    5,276
2 hours ago, apoc81 said:

The universe is constantly expanding, that means, in effect, it is not infinite. 

 

You might want to reread exactly what I said.

 

We aren't certain.

 

It could be infinite.

 

It may not be infinite.

 

Our current understanding of the universe is that it can inflate forever.

 

We will never be able to find out whether or not either is true within the project lifespan of humanity unless we make some extraordinary leaps in astrophysics, mathematics, science, technology and engineering.

 

 

At best, we can only conclude that the universe both flat and more vast than we can see

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×